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research-and-clinical-trials

Outcomes Improving for Pediatric Kidney Transplant Recipients

New research in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons shows pediatric kidney transplant recipients have significantly improved one-year survival rates, as well as improved organ function after 10 years. Study investigator Srinath Chinnakotla, MD, FACS, attribute the improvements to better surgical techniques, anti-rejection medication and living donor protocols.

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patient-care

Zuzia’s New Skin: A Pioneering Treatment for EB

A young girl named Zuzia and her family traveled from Poland to University of Minnesota seeking treatment for a rare, incurable disease. Her outcome was life-changing. Jakub Tolar, M.D., director of the Stem Cell Institute and vice dean of the University of Minnesota Medical School, has pioneered a procedure to help patients overcome this debilitating genetic disorder. Health Talk is sharing this story in observance of Rare Disease Day 2017. It was written by Nicole Endres and first published in University of Minnesota Foundation’s Legacy magazine.

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research-and-clinical-trials

ACL tears increasing among kids, study shows

(Photo credit: Steven Depolo/Flickr)

ACL tears in patients ages 6-18 have increased about 2.3 percent each year for the past 20 years, marking a significant upward trend. The injuries coincided with high school, suggesting a link with more intense sporting activity. The data, published in the latest journal Pediatrics, could help doctors prevent, detect and treat such issues in young patients.

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expert-perspectives

ACA repeal could greatly impact women’s health

Since President Donald Trump’s inauguration, there has been a steady drop in the probability that the Affordable Care Act will be repealed by the end of April. A recent Washington Post poll shows a 35 percent chance of that happening. However, this does not quell the fears raised by what a repeal could mean.

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expert-perspectives

Cervical cancer is killing more women than medical experts thought, study says

“In my opinion, the study’s most disturbing revelation was this: black women living in the United States die at the same rate from cervical cancer as women living in sub-Saharan Africa,” said Christopher Pennell, Ph.D., associate director for Community Engagement at the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, referring to a recent study about cervical cancer. “If this isn’t a wake-up call, I don’t know what is.”

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nutrition

Beverages Shown on TV Shows May Adversely Impact Youth Health

photo courtesy alexisnyal via Flickr

A recent study found that beverages shown in TV shows may have adverse health impacts for youth.

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