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research-and-clinical-trials

Biomarker may predict recurrence in endometrial cancer patients

Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic cancer in the U.S.

New research from the lab of Martina Bazzaro, Ph.D., of the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota and Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Women’s Health, suggests the deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) USP14 as a promising biomarker for identifying risk of recurrence in endometrial cancer patients.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: Improved fitness linked to reduced type 2 diabetes risk

In a new University of Minnesota Medical School study, researchers found that increasing fitness could slow the onset or reduce risk of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes.

The longest-running study of its kind, researchers looked at more than 4,000 participants from Minnesota, California, Alabama and Illinois, with data spanning over more than two decades. The study was published in Diabetologia.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: At-home medication therapy management services beneficial for some patients

Managing medications can be difficult. An aging population with a variety of health challenges brings the need for more at-home care options, especially for managing medications.

Shannon Reidt, Pharm.D., MPH, assistant professor in the University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, and her team members found that at-home pharmacy visits can help people better manage their medications.

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expert-perspectives

Expert perspective: California to raise legal age to purchase tobacco from 18 to 21

According to a recent article in Yahoo news, California Governor Jerry Brown approved raising the legal age to buy tobacco for smoking, dipping, chewing and vaping from 18 to 21.

California is hoping that increasing the legal age to purchase tobacco will lower the addiction rate of nicotine. According to Dorothy Hatsukami, Ph.D., a professor in the University of Minnesota Department of Psychiatry who focuses on tobacco addictions and cancer prevention, young people are more susceptible to addictions because their brains are still developing.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: physical activity may decrease fatigue, support development in young cancer patients

Children undergoing cancer treatment often experience fatigue. Researchers are now investigating whether maintaining a level of physical activity during treatment and recovery may ease symptoms. Having more energy can support a child’s healthy growth and development during and after cancer.

That’s why Casey Hooke, Ph.D., APRN, assistant professor in the University of Minnesota School of Nursing, and member of the Masonic Cancer Center, is dedicated to finding ways to help children have more energy during cancer treatments.

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u-of-m-voices

Maternal consumption of artificially sweetened beverages can lead to infant weight gain

Childhood obesity rates have more than doubled in the last 30 years. One third of children in developed countries are overweight or obese, putting them at a high risk for many diseases.

Now, a new study published online today suggests that childhood obesity could be influenced even before birth.

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