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Enterovirus D68 confirmed in MN by MDH, UMN

Photo courtesy Flickr user KristyFaith

Enterovirus D68 is hospitalizing children around the Midwest due to its severe asthma attack-like symptoms. Today, it is confirmed that the virus has reached Minnesota.

According to a statement from the Minnesota Department of Health, its lab tests confirmed one case of having Enterovirus 68 (EV-D68). Labs at the University of Minnesota have also confirmed EV D68 in 11 samples from the University of Minnesota Children’s Hospital.

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expert-perspectives

What you need to know about Enterovirus D-68

robert terrell/CC 2.0/https://flic.kr/p/aE4QU

Help avoid spreading viruses by washing hands often, cleaning surfaces with antiseptic products, and properly covering coughs and sneezes.

The spread of respiratory illnesses in children across the Midwest, just as school began, has parents on edge. There’s concern over how contagious this illness might be, and whether it can be quite serious.

Enteroviruses are common viruses affecting people of all ages, but especially children. These viruses can cause a variety of illnesses, including the common cold and even hand-foot-and-mouth disease. There are more than 90 different strains and these viruses can cause a variety of illnesses, including the common cold and even hand-foot-and-mouth disease. The current strain causing concern is Enterovirus D-68, or EV-D68. The virus usually affects the respiratory system, causing inflammation of the small and medium airways resulting in an asthma attack-like response.

HealthTalk checked in with pediatric infectious disease physician Bazak Sharon M.D to get more on what parents need to know to help keep their families healthy.

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news-and-notes

U of M Raptor Center to celebrate 40 years, release rehabilitated birds Sept. 27

The Raptor Center at the University of Minnesota, Carpenter St. Croix Valley Nature Center, and the 3M Foundation will release rehabilitated birds back into the wild at this year’s Fall Raptor Release on Saturday, September 27 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event will also mark a milestone in The Raptor’s Center 40th anniversary celebrations.

The free and public family event will take place rain or shine at the Carpenter-St. Croix Valley Nature Center, located at 12805 St. Croix Trail S., Hastings, Minn. Please note construction on County Road 21 and St. Croix Trail is ongoing and sections of traffic are single-lane.

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beyond-minnesota

First World Suicide Report released on World Suicide Prevention Day at University of Minnesota

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For the first time, the World Health Organization (WHO) has created the World Suicide Report in collaboration with nations around the world. It is being released today in the USA in recognition of World Suicide Prevention Day by SAVE, IASP and the University of Minnesota.

According to the World Health Organization, more than 800,000 people die by suicide each year, one person every 40 seconds, and suicide is the second leading cause of death for people 15-29 years old.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: Unmatched insights into deep brain stimulation through MRI

U of M researchers are developing three-dimensional patient-specific anatomical models of the brain that allows physicians to identify and pinpoint an exact target location for deep brain stimulation.

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a procedure that is used to treat movement disorders including Parkinson’s disease, tremor and dystonia. To improve symptoms, a DBS lead (insulated wire) is surgically inserted deep within the brain in sites known to control movement.

Electrical impulses are sent from the neurostimulator, also known as a brain pacemaker, to the lead implanted in the brain. The stimulation changes the pattern of electrical activity in the brain into a more normal pattern, thereby improving symptoms and returning more normal movement to patients.

Choosing the target location for the lead is of critical importance. Standard protocol among physicians around the world is to use a brain atlas developed from two French women who donated their brains to science many years ago. From there physicians superimpose the patient’s own brain MRI images and calculate a plan to implant the electrodes in the brain.

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in-the-news

U of M study reveals kids exposed to more fat shaming comments on TV than adults

Photo courtesy Flickr user Michael Cramer

In a general sense, children’s television has a reputation for being politically correct, however, a new study reveals television aimed at kids contains just as many, if not more, weight-stigmatizing, or fat shaming, conversations.

The study led by Marla Eisenberg Sc.D., M.P.H., an epidemiologist at the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health, was recently published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders. Eisenberg analyzed the content of more than 30 episodes of popular kid shows and identified the number of weight-stigmatizing incidents.

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