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Meningitis B vaccine study raises questions about vaccine response in recent New Jersey university outbreak

A new study from the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health examined a college Meningitis B outbreak  in New Jersey, and found that about a third of students who had received the Meningitis B vaccine did not have a detectable immune response to the disease.

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research-and-clinical-trials

UMN researchers connecting links to sleep issues and Parkinson’s disease

It is estimated that 50-60 percent of people with Parkinson’s disease have disordered sleep. Colum MacKinnon, Ph.D., associate professor of neurology at the University of Minnesota is embarking on a study that is looking at the link between abnormal muscle activity during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in people with Parkinson’s disease and how the disease progresses.

MacKinnon’s long term goal of the research is to be able to identify specific REM sleep features that are predictive of disease onset and progression, so clinicians can better diagnose and possibly treat neurological disease well before it manifests.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Health Talk recommends: Speaking for the Voiceless

Editor’s note: This article originally appeared on the School of Public Health’s website.

The world is experiencing two important demographic shifts: people are living longer and our population is becoming more diverse. A growing aging population results in major implications for health systems, families, and the economy. In the United States, 80 percent of people over the age of 65 are white. By 2050, that percentage will drop to 59 while the number of Asians and Hispanics in this age group will triple.
Tetyana Shippee

At the intersection of these two major public health changes lies the research of School of Public Health Assistant Professor Tetyana Shippee. She’s working to help answer a very large question: How can we make care toward the end of life a more positive experience, regardless of race, ethnicity, or culture?

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: Cigarette smoking prevalence remains high among American Indians in Hennepin County and Ramsey County

Photo: Raul Lieberwirth/CC/https://flic.kr/p/mWYqx

A recent analysis from the Tribal Tobacco Use Project Survey of 964 urban American Indian residents in Hennepin County and Ramsey County in 2011 found a high prevalence of cigarette smoking among persons aged 25-44 years (72 percent). Among all survey respondents 59 percent were current smokers, 19 percent were former smokers and 22 percent had never smoked.

Furthermore, the smoking rate and secondhand smoke exposure is still high despite being covered by Minnesota’s strong smoke-free law.

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research-and-clinical-trials

CMRR and HCMC collaborate to study traumatic brain injury effects on vision

The University of Minnesota’s Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) and Hennepin County Medical Center’s (HCMC) Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Center are collaborating on an innovative research project to help people who experienced TBI and still suffer from lingering vision effects.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Study shows CDC’s PulseNet cost-effectively prevents illness and saves money

Editor’s note: This post originally appeared on the School of Public Health’s blog.

A study from the School of Public Health shows that over the past 20 years, PulseNet, a foodborne outbreak surveillance system, has justified its expense by preventing thousands of bacterial infections and saving millions of dollars in medical and productivity costs.

The study, led by Professor Craig Hedberg and economist Robert Scharff from Ohio State University, was recently published in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine.

“If it weren’t for the activity of PulseNet, we’d actually have seen an increase in infections, such as Salmonella, over time in the United States,” says Hedberg.

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