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research-and-clinical-trials

CMRR and HCMC collaborate to study traumatic brain injury effects on vision

The University of Minnesota’s Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) and Hennepin County Medical Center’s (HCMC) Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Center are collaborating on an innovative research project to help people who experienced TBI and still suffer from lingering vision effects.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Study shows CDC’s PulseNet cost-effectively prevents illness and saves money

Editor’s note: This post originally appeared on the School of Public Health’s blog.

A study from the School of Public Health shows that over the past 20 years, PulseNet, a foodborne outbreak surveillance system, has justified its expense by preventing thousands of bacterial infections and saving millions of dollars in medical and productivity costs.

The study, led by Professor Craig Hedberg and economist Robert Scharff from Ohio State University, was recently published in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine.

“If it weren’t for the activity of PulseNet, we’d actually have seen an increase in infections, such as Salmonella, over time in the United States,” says Hedberg.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: UMN researchers develop unique method to analyze oxidative DNA damage in age-related macular degeneration

The triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, part of the Masonic Cancer Center’s Analytical Biochemistry Shared Resource, was used for the analysis of mitochondrial DNA adducts by liquid chromatography nanoelectrospray-tandem mass spectrometry.

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among older adults in the developed world. To better understand the mechanisms of AMD to hopefully one day prevent and treat it, researchers in the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health and the Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Neurosciences have developed a unique method for analyzing oxidative damage in tiny amounts of DNA from the human eye. Results of the study were recently published in Scientific Reports.

Led by Irina Stepanov, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School of Public Health and Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, the team used a highly sensitive method that can detect specific oxidative modifications in DNA. They used this method to analyze mitochondrial DNA from retinal pigment epithelium, a single cell layer from eye tissues, and compared results between samples that came from healthy eyes and those with age-related macular degeneration.

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expert-perspectives

SPH report: Health status of American Indians/Alaska Natives continues to decline – Part 3

Editor’s note: This is the third post in a three part series. The first and second posts can be found here and here. A summary of the report can be found here. The complete report can be found here.

Throughout this series we’ve provided you with an overview of a recent report by Linda Frizzell, Ph.D., assistant professor in the University of Minnesota School of Public Health that shows the overwhelming and persistent health disparities American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) face.

The conclusion of the series will highlight some additional challenges AI/ANs endure, and Frizzell will provide some recommendations for policymakers to improve AI/AN health.

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expert-perspectives

SPH report: Health status of American Indians/Alaska Natives continues to decline – Part 2

Editor’s note: This is the second post in a three part series. The first post can be found here. A summary of the report can be found here. The complete report can be found here.

Yesterday we discussed the persistent health inequities American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) face today brought forth in a new report by Linda Frizzell, Ph.D., assistant professor in the University of Minnesota School of Public Health.

The Indian health system (IHS) is unlike any other. It serves some of the poorest, sickest and most remote populations in the United States. Each tribe’s culture guides their elected leadership to meet their respective needs in this complex environment.

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expert-perspectives

SPH report: Health status of American Indians/Alaska Natives continues to decline – Part 1

Editor’s note: This is the first post in a three part series. The second post can be found here. A summary of the report can be found here. The complete report can be found here.

A new report recently released by Linda Frizzell, Ph.D., assistant professor in the University of Minnesota School of Public Health further highlights the persistent health inequities American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) face today.

AI/AN tribes have a fraught relationship with the federal government due to a history of attempted genocide, forced acculturation, severely underfunded health services and a health status that continues to decline. Frizzell says there remains a complex quagmire of federal Indian law, policy and intergovernmental relationships.

AI/ANs have long experienced lower health status compared to other Americans, including lower life expectancy, disproportionate disease burden perhaps due to problems with access to care, including primary health care and behavioral health services, specialty medical care, long-term care, emergency services, disproportionate poverty, discrimination in the delivery of health services, limited educational opportunities and cultural differences.

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