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In The News: Maternal Mental Illness

More than 500,000 women in the United States encounter postpartum depression every year. According to a new article co-authored by Katy Kozhimannil, Ph.D., School of Public Health, depression symptoms can start during pregnancy — negatively impacting both the mother and baby.

“…maternal illness adversely affects infant brain development and subsequent social and emotional health as a result of inadequate prenatal care, poor birth outcomes, and impaired parenting practices,” Kozhimannil and co-author Helen Kim wrote last week in Science Magazine.

Some states across the country have started screening and treatment for depression, but according to Kozhimannil and Kim, that’s not enough.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: U of M study could improve treatment for atrial fibrillation patients

Credit: Vera Kratochvil

A recent University of Minnesota study found that cognitive decline in people with atrial fibrillation (abnormal heartbeat) is mediated by subclinical cerebral infarcts, otherwise known as silent strokes.

The paper, titled Atrial Fibrillation and Cognitive Decline — The Role of Subclinical Cerebral Infarcts, was published last month in StrokeLin Yee Chen, M.D., M.S., a University of Minnesota cardiologist, led the study.

The paper, titled Atrial Fibrillation and Cognitive Decline — The Role of Subclinical Cerebral Infarcts, was published last month in StrokeLin Yee Chen, M.D., M.S., a University of Minnesota cardiologist, led the study.

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in-the-news

In The News: Innovative U of M clinical trial offers hope for rare skin disease

Children with epidermolysis bullosa (EB) face large life challenges from the get-go. The genetic disorder leaves skin extremely fragile and with visible rashes and painful blisters. According to an NBC News report, approximately 25,000 to 50,000 Americans, mostly children, live with EB and people who don’t receive treatment often die by the age of 30.

But a clinical trial led by Jakub Tolar, M.D., Ph.D., professor and pediatric blood and marrow transplant physician at the University of Minnesota Medical School, may help improve the quality of life for those diagnosed with EB.

“This is one of the most difficult to treat disorders and a very painful disorder,” Tolar said in the NBC News report. “Before we started, there was absolutely nothing that would change the outcome of these children.”

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: Media coverage of Affordable Care Act implementation varied by region

The legend of Paul Bunyan and Babe the Blue Ox came to life in Minnesota last year, with MNsure advertisements featuring the mythical duo in a campaign titled, “The Land of 10,000 Reasons to get Health Insurance.”

Nine million dollars were spent on the Minnesota advertisements, which popped up on every medium from billboards to television. While some parts of the country experienced advertising and media coverage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) taking effect similar to Minnesota’s, other regions of the United States saw much more or much less coverage according to new research led by Sarah Gollust, Ph.D., assistant professor in the University of Minnesota School of Public Health.

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in-the-news

In The News: The burden of diabetes

By 2050, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that one in three people in the U.S. could have diabetes. Each year, the number of people with type one and type two diabetes increases.

Elizabeth Seaquist, M.D.Medical School, recently spoke with KSTP-TV about diabetes research and how the disease’s prevalence can be decreased.

Seaquist also wrote an article for The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) titled, Addressing the Burden of Diabetes.

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expert-perspectives

What does broccoli sprout tea have to do with cancer?

From a young age, kids are taught to eat their vegetables for the healthy benefits they pose. Now research is suggesting cruciferous vegetables like broccoli sprouts could offer more gains — cancer prevention.

Stephen Hecht, Ph.D., a University of Minnesota professor of laboratory medicine and pathology, and member of the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, conducts research focusing on tobacco-related cancer prevention. He recently was part of a different kind of groundbreaking research finding the right diet has the ability to decrease risks of developing certain types of cancer.

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