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U of M graduates first cohort of Saudi Arabia MHA students

2014 Saudi Arabia MHA cohort

A unique cohort of 25 Executive Master of Health Administration (MHA) students graduated from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health having never before stepped foot in Minnesota, and having taken all of their classes while living in Saudi Arabia.

Similar to many students of the stateside MHA program, students of the Saudi Arabian program were all full-time professionals who completed a University of Minnesota MHA degree in 25 months.

The Saudi Arabia Executive MHA program launched at the King Fahad Medical City (KFMC) in Riyadh, Saudi in 2012. The program was the first of its kind available in Saudi Arabia and attracted healthcare professionals who wished to further grow their careers.

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beyond-minnesota

Food safety tips for traveling

Headed to Brazil for the 2014 FIFA World Cup? Already thinking about the tantalizing smells of colorful and delicious new foods? For some people, food is the reason to travel. But while the mouthwatering smell of new and exotic treats may call out to travelers’ taste buds, their stomachs may not always be up for the adventure.

It’s a common misconception that food abroad isn’t as “safe” as food at home. While true for some things, more often than not eating food abroad can cause illness because no matter how healthy you are, you haven’t developed defenses against all bacteria — especially bacteria foreign to you. Something as seemingly harmless as a piece of melon can wreak havoc on a person’s system if not properly prepared.

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beyond-minnesota

Is the biggest threat to wild cats … dogs? The research is in.

Amur Tiger via Flickr CC/Martin Pettitt

Big cat populations including the Amur tiger and Amur leopard are in jeopardy of extinction. Fewer than 550 Amur tigers and leopards remain in the wilderness of China and the Russian Far East today. Alongside threats posed by changing climates and human pressures, is another threat to cats that may sound familiar: dogs.

That’s right. A virus carried by the domestic dog may be one of the biggest threats to endangered wild felids like the Amur tiger.

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beyond-minnesota

Can this tool predict and prevent food fraud before people get sick?

While 2012 marked the introduction of watershed federal food-safety reforms started by the passage of the Food Safety Modernization Act in 2011; the United States’ contaminated food problem still remains somewhat unresolved.

Each year, roughly one in six Americans contracts a foodborne illness, and countless more consume foods that aren’t exactly what their packaging claims – honey, olive oil, maple syrup and fish are all frequent targets of food fraud …

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beyond-minnesota

Health Talk Recommends: Watch polio disappear across the world

You can literally watch polio disappear from countries across the world in this Vine video posted by the Gates Foundation.

The quick but powerful video shows there are still three countries to go to fully eradicate the disease, but we’ve come so far as a global society in battling this once crippling disease.

The Health Talk team thought this was pretty cool. Take a look!

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beyond-minnesota

U of M doctor helps change diabetes care in Africa, gains valuable perspective

Antoinette Moran, M.D., left, stands with other physicians on her most recent trip to Africa.

It’s not often a doctor has the opportunity to help mold the health care system of an entire country, but since 2007 Antoinette Moran, M.D., a professor and pediatric endocrinologist at the University of Minnesota, has supported a dramatic shift in how Uganda, Tanzania and Kenya approach the fight against pediatric diabetes.

Moran made her first trip to African in 2007, visiting Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda, where the University has a resident exchange program. After seeing a call for faculty volunteers interested in providing teaching assistance Moran signed up. However, due to the sophistication of diabetes care in the U.S., she was worried about the level to which she’d be able to contribute.

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