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expert-perspectives

Game Changer: Gabe Loor

April is National Donate Life Month, which urges Americans to become organ donors and potentially play a part in saving a life. Gabe Loor, a cardiovascular and thoracic surgeon at University of Minnesota Medical School, is a key cog in improving the transplantation process by helping to develop more effective surgical methods.

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expert-perspectives

Health Talk Recommends: Assessing the ACA’s impact on pregnant inmates

U.S. Coast Guard photo courtesy Petty Officer 2nd Class Lauren Jorgensen via flickr

Pregnancy can be hard in the best of circumstances. For a pregnant inmate, incarceration opens up a whole new set of challenges faced only by expectant mothers behind bars.

To coincide with the March issue of Health Affairs, which focuses on issues related to incarceration and health, University of Minnesota researchers Katy Kozhimannil, Ph.D. of the School of Public Health and Rebecca Shlafer, Ph.D. of the Medical School wrote about what the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will mean for the 6-10 percent of female prisoners who are pregnant during their incarceration.

“Currently, pregnant inmates have increased rates of complicated and preterm deliveries, and mothers and their babies have more risk factors and worse birth outcomes than similar women who are not incarcerated,” said Kozhimannil.

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expert-perspectives

U of M researchers: New data shows dramatic rise in a new form of tendinitis known as “selfie elbow”

If you’ve spent any amount of time on social media sites like Instagram or Facebook over the past year, you’ve likely witnessed firsthand the rise of the “selfie.” Now, a new analysis by University of Minnesota orthopaedic surgeons shows the seemingly harmless trend may not be so harmless after all.

In a study published today in the journal Human Medicine, U of M researchers present data linking a recent rise in elbow injuries to the practice of taking a selfie, which the experts say places awkward, repetitive torque on the elbow’s ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) and radial collateral ligament (RCL).

“Years ago, we saw a rise in stress-related injuries that became known as  ‘texting thumb’ – basically a form of tendinitis,” said Jeffrey Macalena, M.D., an assistant professor of orthopaedic surgery in the University of Minnesota Medical School. “Now, young patients are pouring into our clinics complaining of elbow soreness that we’ve pinpointed to the rising selfie trend. We’re calling it selfie elbow, and it can be fairly serious.”

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expert-perspectives

Make the most out of Daylight Saving Time

Photo: Paradigm via Flickr

This weekend, we spring ahead and lose an hour of sleep as part of Daylight Saving Time. For many people, this may create some problems only because they forgot to set their clock ahead before going to bed.

For those who tend to be night owls, shift workers, or who have sleep disorders, it can be more problematic. The additional loss of precious sleep can be a more substantial problem. When we are sleepy, we often don’t perform as well at work and are more likely to make mistakes and have car accidents.

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expert-perspectives

New sugar recommendations are bittersweet

photo courtesy david pacey via Flickr.

What do sweet and sour chicken, fruit yogurt, and pasta sauces have in common? It may surprise you, but all of these pre-packaged foods typically contain more than your recommended daily amount of sugar.

According to new draft guidelines published by the World Health Organization (WHO), people should try and limit the amount of sugar they consume to 5 percent of their daily calorie intake. But if 5 percent is too difficult, the WHO has determined that to avoid weight gain and minimize risk of diseases like diabetes, absolutely no more than 10 percent of a person’s daily calorie intake should be made up of sugar.

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expert-perspectives

Sedentary lifestyle, not shoveling itself, contributes to health hazards

This probably isn’t news to you but shoveling that wet, heavy snow can be a real pain in the neck, err back. Unfortunately, some people have experienced that shoveling snow has led to aches, pains and in some severe instances heart attacks.

And while true in certain cases, the problem isn’t solely dependent upon the snow shoveling activity itself but rather the sedentary lifestyle that some of these people live.

Shoveling is a lot of work and you do use a lot of muscles in your legs, arms and back which places extra strain on your heart.

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