Academic Health Center
Stay Connected
in-the-news

D.C. Snowy Owl Soars on the Wings of Science

The physical reconditioning of a raptor patient like The Raptor Center’s snowy owl patient from Washington, D.C., prior to its release is an important step in patient rehabilitation. It must compliment the medical care provided and restore a raptor’s fitness to a level necessary for survival.

Read more
in-the-news

In the News: U of M offers new cancer treatment for neuroblastoma

Neuroblastoma, a type of childhood cancer, is difficult to treat. And according to the American Cancer Institute, about 700 people in the United States are diagnosed with this form of cancer each year.

Raymond Yeager has dealt with the neuroblastoma since he was 14 years old. Now 20, he’s undergone many treatments including chemotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery, a stem cell transplant and immunotherapy. Unfortunately, nothing has helped…

Read more
in-the-news

U of M helping LVAD patients live longer, fuller lives

For heart patients living with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD), until recently living in close proximity to the doctor who performed the surgery was a necessity. Now, more LVAD patients are able to live closer to their cardiologist giving them more flexibility.

Previously seen as a bridge to a heart transplant, now LVADs are lasting for years in comparison to twenty years ago when they would only last days and months.

Last week, nurse practitioners, physicians, cardiologists and LVAD patients convened at the University of Minnesota for the first-ever LVAD Shared Care symposium. The goal of the symposium was to help health care providers who care for LVAD patients in the community better understand the advanced technology and help to alleviate their fears and concerns when working with these patients.

Read more
in-the-news

In the News: U of M doctor offers expertise on rare condition

Teenagers Jonathon and Christopher Naquin of Humble, Texas have never been able to pinpoint the cause of their mysterious symptoms.

Since childhood, Jonathon, 18, and Christopher, 16, experienced significant levels of protein and blood in their urine and even suffered hearing loss while in elementary school.

But now, after years of tests and baffling doctors, the two boys and their family finally received the answer they were looking for: Alport Syndrome. Never heard of it? You’re not alone…

Read more
in-the-news

35 years later, plane crash survivor works to give back

At 63-years-old, Sheryl Ramstad is making a bold career move. After nearly four decades in law, she just obtained her Master of Nursing degree from the University of Minnesota.

“I have a passion for burn victims, burn patients and burn survivors,” Ramstad told KARE 11 last week. “I can provide a perspective to burn victims that there is life after burns.”

Ramstad’s unique perspective stems from an experience she had as a student pilot in 1979. During her first solo flight, the plane’s engine sputtered over St. Paul leaving Ramstad to guide the lifeless aircraft back to the ground…

Read more
in-the-news

In the News: Western scientists look to traditional Chinese medicine to treat cancer

Photo: Flickr user bomb_bao via CC

Traditional Chinese plants and medicines might seem like an unusual way to treat a serious illness. However, these historic remedies have caught the eye of medical researchers. The latest research from Samuel Waxman, M.D., of Mount Sinai Hospital states that traditional Chinese medicine could be as advantageous to chemotherapy in the treatment of some forms of cancer including leukemia.

Arsenic trioxide, traditionally used in Chinese medicine, was approved as a treatment for leukemia in 2000 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Following this approval, research later proved that patients that were given chemotherapy followed by arsenic trioxide did better than the patients that received the standard chemotherapy alone.

Read more