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D.C. Snowy Owl Taken to The Raptor Center at the University of Minnesota for Care

The snowy owl reportedly hit by a bus in Washington, D.C., in late January 2014 recently arrived to The Raptor Center at the University of Minnesota for care.

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Epilepsy drug lamotrigine use in pregnancy: fewer doctor visits ahead?

Photo: tipstimes.com/pregnancy via Flickr CC

For women with epilepsy, controlling health-threatening seizures is especially important during a pregnancy.

Taking the right dose of medicine can be key… and challenging.

As a baby grows, a pregnant woman’s body weight must also grow to support her baby. Consequently, a pregnant woman may require more medication to keep seizures at bay than she did pre-pregnancy. Pregnant women with epilepsy regularly visit the doctor to have blood drawn and adjust their antiepilepsy medicine dosage.

Now, new data analyses from the University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy and Harvard Medical School find one fifth of pregnant women may someday be able to control seizures with fewer visits to the doctor.

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What is an ACL injury and how is it treated?

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U of M doctors taking new approach to children’s mental health care

Child psychologists at the University of Minnesota are pushing for more personalized mental healthcare. That is why Gerald August, Ph.D., and Abigail Gewirtz, Ph.D., made personalized mental health intervention programs the focus of the newly founded Center for Personalization Research in Children’s Mental Health.

Traditionally, evidence-based mental health interventions (EBPs) use a planned model in which composition and dosage are predetermined based on factors in the patient’s case. This approach has helped some, but it hasn’t worked to its full potential. In many cases, EBPs can be costly and burdensome…

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Making your New Year’s resolutions stick

New Year's Resolutions, list of items

Editor’s note: This feature originally appeared on the University of Minnesota Physicians website.

Every January, we pack into gyms and health food outlets in pursuit of New Year’s resolutions to lose weight, live healthier or start a fitness routine.

But a month later, many of us have given up, scaled back or ditched the yoga mat for the familiar comfort of our living room couch.

We all have a million reasons for slipping up: work, family, a bum knee or the new season of your favorite TV show. Old habits die hard, and kick-starting a new routine isn’t exactly a walk in the park.

But there are strategies and tactics you can use to maximize your potential for long-term success. Here to help is Dr. Michael Miller, a University of Minnesota Physicians psychologist and an expert in behavioral change.

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Time to see the specialist? Medication woes might call for pharmacist

Photo: Flickr user Victor/CC/flickr.com/photos/v1ctor/6889837424

For the millions of Americans with chronic conditions like asthma, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and diabetes, taking all the right medications at the right times can be a challenging, if not impossible, task.

With the insight that comes from seeing several thousand patients each year, Allyson Schlichte, Pharm.D., understands the medication challenges facing many Americans. But by some accounts, she’s an unusual “doctor” to meet in the hospital exam room.

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