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research-and-clinical-trials

University of Minnesota brings research opportunities to fairgoers

The University of Minnesota’s new Driven to Discover Building will open its doors at this year’s Great Minnesota Get-Together. This new collaboration will connect researchers with more than 1.7 million State Fair attendees each year.

The building houses more than 30 University research groups, who will engage adults and children in research focusing on a wide array of topics such as bullying, genetics, jury decision-making, and more. Not only is the new building an example of operational excellence, the combination of the building and State Fair, is an excellent representation of the University’s efficient research and outreach efforts.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: More research-based evidence needed in legislative discussions about childhood obesity in Minnesota

Photo credit: Michael Hicks via Flickr

How our legislators make decisions depends on a variety of factors such as expert beliefs, constituents’ opinions, political principles and research-based evidence. And while we’d like to think more decisions are made utilizing research-based evidence, a new study by researchers at the School of Public Health and the Medical School at the University of Minnesota along with collaborators at the American Heart Association and the Public Health Law Center found only 41 percent of all formal legislative discussions over childhood obesity-related bills in Minnesota from 2007-2011 cited some form of research-based evidence.

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research-and-clinical-trials

University of Minnesota study finds mothers in poorer health are less likely to breastfeed

Photo credit: DSC_6978 via Flickr

Pediatricians agree exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life provides a wealth of benefits to a mother and child. But new research from the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota finds one-third of women enter pregnancy in poorer health, and are less likely to plan to breastfeed and less successful at exclusive breastfeeding when they do plan to breastfeed their babies. The study found women who are obese, have diabetes or have hypertension were 30 percent less likely to intend to breastfeed than mothers without health complications.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: U of M study could improve treatment for atrial fibrillation patients

Credit: Vera Kratochvil

A recent University of Minnesota study found that cognitive decline in people with atrial fibrillation (abnormal heartbeat) is mediated by subclinical cerebral infarcts, otherwise known as silent strokes.

The paper, titled Atrial Fibrillation and Cognitive Decline — The Role of Subclinical Cerebral Infarcts, was published last month in StrokeLin Yee Chen, M.D., M.S., a University of Minnesota cardiologist, led the study.

The paper, titled Atrial Fibrillation and Cognitive Decline — The Role of Subclinical Cerebral Infarcts, was published last month in StrokeLin Yee Chen, M.D., M.S., a University of Minnesota cardiologist, led the study.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: Media coverage of Affordable Care Act implementation varied by region

The legend of Paul Bunyan and Babe the Blue Ox came to life in Minnesota last year, with MNsure advertisements featuring the mythical duo in a campaign titled, “The Land of 10,000 Reasons to get Health Insurance.”

Nine million dollars were spent on the Minnesota advertisements, which popped up on every medium from billboards to television. While some parts of the country experienced advertising and media coverage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) taking effect similar to Minnesota’s, other regions of the United States saw much more or much less coverage according to new research led by Sarah Gollust, Ph.D., assistant professor in the University of Minnesota School of Public Health.

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research-and-clinical-trials

University of Minnesota research finds ACA insurance expansions reduce health care spending burdens for young adults

A new study published today in the August issue of the journal Health Affairs by Ezra Golberstein, Ph.D., professor in the Division of Health Policy and Management at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, in collaboration with Susan Busch, Ph.D., of Yale University and Ellen Meara, Ph.D., of Dartmouth College, found the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) provision allowing young adults to stay on their parents’ insurance plans until they turn 26, was associated with significant reductions in the likelihood that young adults had to pay high out-of-pocket costs for health care.

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