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Maternal consumption of artificially sweetened beverages can lead to infant weight gain

Childhood obesity rates have more than doubled in the last 30 years. One third of children in developed countries are overweight or obese, putting them at a high risk for many diseases.

Now, a new study published online today suggests that childhood obesity could be influenced even before birth.

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Q&A: The importance of having diverse providers that reflect patient populations

Photo: CC, Harsha K R, https://flic.kr/p/5q1B6r

By 2044, more than half of all Americans are projected to belong to a minority group, according to recent census data. By 2060, nearly one in five of the nation’s total population is projected to be foreign born.

In the medical community, it’s important to reflect that changing demographic landscape.

Health Talk spoke with spoke with Roli Dwivedi, M.D., Medical Director at CUHCC, to learn more about the importance of having diverse care providers.w

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College of Pharmacy’s Dean Speedie steps down as College reaches 2nd in the Nation

A lot can change in twenty years. From a program shift to a doctoral degree, to an addition of another location in Duluth, Dean Marilyn Speedie has been with the University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy through a wide range of exciting moments. As she prepares to step down as dean in early 2017 and transition to a faculty appointment, Speedie is leaving the College of Pharmacy better than when she started. In fact, the school was just ranked the number 2 Pharmacy school in the country by US News and World Report.

We sat down with Speedie to ask her about her time here in the College of Pharmacy and how it will continue to move forward and serve the needs of Minnesota.

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What are the implications of King vs. Burwell?

Photo credit: Kaiser Health News

Note: This post was written by Jean Abraham, Ph.D., and Lynn Blewett, Ph.D.

On March 4, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in the case of King vs. Burwell. The Supreme Court’s decision on this case will have significant implications for the capacity of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to reduce the number of uninsured persons in the United States. In this brief we provide an overview of the potential impact of this case on the implementation of the ACA.

Background: The ACA’s Coverage Expansion Mechanisms

The ACA expanded access to health insurance coverage through two primary mechanisms. The first mechanism is an expansion of the Medicaid program through the extension of eligibility to individuals with modified adjusted gross income up to 138 percent of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) (approximately $33,465 for a family of four). The primary beneficiaries of this expansion are low-income childless adults, as Medicaid eligibility for adults historically has been tied to parental status except at the lowest income levels. In 2012, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that states could choose whether or not to expand Medicaid, and 30 states, including the District of Columbia, have done so to date.

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5 Health Tips for Women

Photo: David Lee

Carrie Ann Terrell, M.D., is an Obstetrician and Gynecologist, specializing in women’s health at the University of Minnesota. Terrell sees patients at the Fibroid Clinic, Women’s Health Specialists Clinic and Leo Fung Center for Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) and Disorders of Sex Development (DSD).

With women’s health week wrapping up, Health Talk wants to remind you that it is never too late to start reaching your health and fitness goals. I’ve compiled 5 tips to help you reach those goals.

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Preventing Colon Cancer in African Americans with Earlier Screening

UMN researchers survey fair goers at the 2014 Minnesota State Fair

In observance of National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, HealthTalk is featuring a University of Minnesota researcher working to reduce the harm caused by colon cancer in the African American community.

Colon cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death for men and women in the United States, but African Americans bear the greatest burden. This is why one University of Minnesota researcher is calling for lowering the age at which African Americans have a routine colonoscopy.

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