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patient-care

D.C. Snowy Owl Returned to Wild by The Raptor Center

 

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patient-care

What is an ACL injury and how is it treated?

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expert-perspectives

Sedentary lifestyle, not shoveling itself, contributes to health hazards

This probably isn’t news to you but shoveling that wet, heavy snow can be a real pain in the neck, err back. Unfortunately, some people have experienced that shoveling snow has led to aches, pains and in some severe instances heart attacks.

And while true in certain cases, the problem isn’t solely dependent upon the snow shoveling activity itself but rather the sedentary lifestyle that some of these people live.

Shoveling is a lot of work and you do use a lot of muscles in your legs, arms and back which places extra strain on your heart.

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expert-perspectives

Winter is the perfect time for outdoor exercise

We know that exercising outdoors during winter months can be challenging. The days are shorter. The nights are longer and even colder. And at times, the weather can be downright dreadful and seemingly unforgiving. The ice, the snow, oh no!

According to William Roberts, M.D., professor with the University of Minnesota Medical School, Family Medicine and Community Health, there are no bad days, only bad clothes.

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expert-perspectives

Sleep key component to athletic performance

The world’s best athletes are descending upon Sochi, Russia for the 2014 Olympic Winter Games. Every elite athlete looks for an edge against their competitors to improve their athletic performance but what if the answer was as simple as getting more sleep?

According to Michael Howell, M.D., a sleep expert within the Department of Neurology, that’s precisely what elite athletes excel at.

“The best athletes I’ve ever met are extremely good sleepers,” said Howell. “Although you may not think your brain is doing much during sleep, your brain is putting connections together and it is amplifying circuits that are important.”

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research-and-clinical-trials

How do you move a 110-ton imaging magnet?

That is probably a question you don’t hear too often but that’s precisely what researchers and staff at the University of Minnesota’s Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) were asking recently when they needed to move the 110-ton imaging magnet from Duluth, Minn. to the University.

The Agilent Technologies magnet is the world’s first 10.5 Tesla whole body human magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) magnet and will be used to aid in brain research and human body imaging.

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