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U of M study reveals kids exposed to more fat shaming comments on TV than adults

Photo courtesy Flickr user Michael Cramer

In a general sense, children’s television has a reputation for being politically correct, however, a new study reveals television aimed at kids contains just as many, if not more, weight-stigmatizing, or fat shaming, conversations.

The study led by Marla Eisenberg Sc.D., M.P.H., an epidemiologist at the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health, was recently published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders. Eisenberg analyzed the content of more than 30 episodes of popular kid shows and identified the number of weight-stigmatizing incidents.

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beyond-minnesota

U of M researcher works to prevent disease transmission in pumas

Photo: Puma via Flickr user fPat Murray/CC 2.0/flic.kr/p/64Dri6

Minnesota may not seem like the obvious place for researching disease transmission and prevention among America’s large wild felids. But through collaborations with Colorado State University, the University of Tasmania, and state and federal agencies, the University of Minnesota will soon begin work studying six wild puma populations in California and Colorado, in addition to Florida’s endangered panther.

The work to study pathogens in puma populations is made possible through a new $2.14 million grant shared among the three institutions from the National Science Foundation.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: Modeling how the flu moves through pig farms

Photo: Bertconcepts via Flickr CC 2.0/flic.kr/p/5ZF1LF

Humans aren’t the only ones who can contract the flu.

Influenza A viruses can also affect pigs and their piglets, which is why, just like in human populations, pig populations are commonly vaccinated against the flu.

Last week, University of Minnesota researchers published a new model addressing how swine producers approach vaccinating their pigs.

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expert-perspectives

Are ”safer” playgrounds better?

Photo courtesy Flickr user Phalinn Ooi

Parents and experts are always looking for ways to keep kids safe, but many agree the movement may have gone too far when it comes to playgrounds.

According to the New York Times, critics of new safer playgrounds say they may stunt emotional development, leaving children with anxieties and fears.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: MRI helps find cancer needle in a haystack

Photo: John Pavelka/CC by 2.0

In previous posts, Health Talk took you inside the broad capabilities and applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in research efforts at the U of M’s Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR).

According to Curtis Corum, Ph.D., assistant professor of radiology in CMRR, finding small tumors can be like finding needles in a haystack. Because catching cancer early – when tumors are at their smallest – can be essential to treatment success, finding those needles is important work. So what if the task could be made less challenging? What if there was a way to remove the haystack so that only needles remained?

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research-and-clinical-trials

U of M study: Increasing access to and awareness of doula support may be beneficial financially and medically

A new study shows increased access to continuous labor support from a birth doula may help decrease non-indicated cesarean births among women who desire doula care. The research was conducted at the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota.

A doula is a trained professional who provides support to women before, during, and after childbirth. This study examined who has access to doula care and the benefits of that access among a national sample of 2,400 women who gave birth in 2011-2012.

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