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expert-perspectives

How relationships affect health and wellbeing

Photo: CC, https://flic.kr/p/fpanYi, Harold Navarro

Valentine’s Day puts love on the brain. Throughout the world, people dedicate the day to celebrating relationships. But we ought to be paying more attention to them, researchers say. Relationships are important to our health and wellbeing every day of the year – not just February 14th.

“Healthy relationships enable us to be who we are,” says Mary Jo Kreitzer, Ph.D., RN, Director of the Center for Spirituality & Healing. “They nurture us and they help us grow. They help us become better people.”

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: Creating internet-based health interventions

Photo: jfcherry via Flickr

One goal of Healthy People 2020 is to “use health communication strategies and health information technology (IT) to improve population health outcomes and health care quality, and to achieve health equity.” In order to help reach this goal, internet-based health interventions are being researched and implemented at the University of Minnesota.

study was recently published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research providing practical guidance for practitioners and public health researchers who wish to develop and implement internet-based health interventions (systems that allow practitioners to provide treatment and prevention programs with the use of websites, mobile texting, apps, etc.).

 

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expert-perspectives

Cervical cancer screening: Is a Pap smear or HPV test better?

Photo: Ed Uthman via Flickr

The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2015, approximately 12,900 new cases of invasive cervical cancer will be diagnosed in the United States alone. To detect those cases, physicians use a Pap smear as the primary cervical cancer screening method.. However, a recent study published in the journal of Gynecologic Oncology, advocates for routine Human Papillomavirus (HPV) screening instead.

The study, authored by an expert panel from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), found that testing for HPV is more beneficial for cervical cancer screening than a Pap smear alone. The authors claim that routine Pap testing, performed every three years, isn’t as beneficial and accurate as routine HPV testing.

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research-and-clinical-trials

UMN research finds room for improvement in Latin American & Caribbean food safety safeguards

Photo: Maize harvest/Neil Palmer CIAT/CC 2.0/ flic.kr/p/8ZqebH

Food safety standards can be shaky at best in developing Caribbean and Latin American regions. In 2002, the World Health Organization (WHO) estimated at least one-third of individuals in developing countries likely contract a foodborne illness each year. And with Latin America and the Caribbean forecasted to play a growing role in global food production and exports in the coming years, that high rate of foodborne illness is one worth paying attention to.

University of Minnesota food safety risk analyst and assistant professor, Fernando Sampedro Parra, Ph.D., has focused his sights on the problem and recently conducted first-of-its-kind research for the region.

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news-and-notes

Rat poisoning’s secondary effects can harm Minnesota owls

Great horned owl photo by Amber Burnette

Winter can invite household nuisances like mice and rats inside along with unwelcome gnawing habits, putrid droppings and disease. But as you look to eradicate vermin from your house this winter, The Raptor Center at the University of Minnesota invites you to take a moment and pause.

Your choice between rat poison and an old-school snap trap could impact human, pet and wildlife health.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Adolescents who eat regular family meals less likely to engage in eating disorder behaviors finds University of Minnesota study

Photo: Inf-Lite Teacher via Flickr CC/www.flickr.com/photos/87328375@N06/9769150651

As a kid, rushing home from a friend’s house to make it to dinner on time may not have been your favorite thing to do. But, it turns out that family meal time may have been worth it after all.

According to a recent study, adolescents, especially girls, who eat more family meals are less likely to engage in harmful eating disorder behaviors. Furthermore, this protection against disordered eating behaviors was found to exist in the majority of families studied, even for adolescents whose families struggled with communication or other challenges.

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