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Dental Therapy: Filling the gaps in dental disparities

Photo courtesy University of Minnesota School of Dentistry

The next time you’re in a dental office, there’s a chance your clinician might say, “Hi, I’m the dental therapist who will be working with you today.” More of these providers are entering the market each year thanks to innovative programs like the one found at the University of Minnesota. As a result, more and more Minnesotans are getting exposed to dental therapists.

But some patients still have questions around what a dental therapist actually is and the type of work they’re licensed to perform. Here’s some quick background.

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expert-perspectives

Health Talk Recommends: Assessing the ACA’s impact on pregnant inmates

U.S. Coast Guard photo courtesy Petty Officer 2nd Class Lauren Jorgensen via flickr

Pregnancy can be hard in the best of circumstances. For a pregnant inmate, incarceration opens up a whole new set of challenges faced only by expectant mothers behind bars.

To coincide with the March issue of Health Affairs, which focuses on issues related to incarceration and health, University of Minnesota researchers Katy Kozhimannil, Ph.D. of the School of Public Health and Rebecca Shlafer, Ph.D. of the Medical School wrote about what the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will mean for the 6-10 percent of female prisoners who are pregnant during their incarceration.

“Currently, pregnant inmates have increased rates of complicated and preterm deliveries, and mothers and their babies have more risk factors and worse birth outcomes than similar women who are not incarcerated,” said Kozhimannil.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Health Talk Recommends: Electrical stimulation helps paralyzed patients move once again

Neuroscientists may have broken new ground in the fight against paralysis.

In new research published today in the journal Brain, a collaborative team of researchers from the University of Louisville, the University of California-Los Angeles and the Pavlov Institute of Physiology in Russia outline how they used neuromodulation and epidural spinal cord stimulation to coax new signals from the brain to the legs of four patients previously paralyzed below the waist. Each patient’s paralysis was the result of spinal cord injury.

While the neuromodulation device was powered on and sending electrical signals down their spines, each man in the study was able to voluntarily move their limbs and support own weight. Each patient has even regained control of their bladder and bowels while regulating their own body temperature and blood pressure.

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in-the-news

D.C. Snowy Owl Soars on the Wings of Science

The physical reconditioning of a raptor patient like The Raptor Center’s snowy owl patient from Washington, D.C., prior to its release is an important step in patient rehabilitation. It must compliment the medical care provided and restore a raptor’s fitness to a level necessary for survival.

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news-and-notes

U of M psychiatry experts, Minnesota legislators align to advance first episode psychosis programs

Last weekend, Minnesota senator Amy Klobuchar visited the University of Minnesota Psychiatry Clinic to host a roundtable discussion around first episode psychosis and to discuss options for improving the care and long-term prognosis for patients suffering psychiatric illness.

Recent federal legislation allocated more behavioral health funding to establish new first episode programs at the state level or bolster existing programs like the one found at the University of Minnesota.

According to Charles Schulz, M.D., chair of the University of Minnesota Medical School’s Department of Psychiatry, Senator Klobuchar has an active interest in mental health but shares the concerns of University providers around the average time it takes patients to receive treatment from the onset of their disease, a statistic that continues to hover around a year and a half.

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research-and-clinical-trials

CMRR’s 10.5 Tesla imaging magnet project moves forward

Last December we took you inside the Center for Magnetic Resonance Research’s (CMRR) latest research project – an effort that will utilize the world’s largest imaging magnet to conduct groundbreaking brain research and human body imaging.

In case you missed it, in late 2013 the 110-ton 10.5 Tesla magnet made a spectacular month-long journey by boat across the Atlantic Ocean from England, through the Great Lakes, and finally made its way from Duluth, MN, to the University of Minnesota campus.

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