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Improving Care for Peripheral Artery Disease in Rural Minnesota

Peripheral artery disease is a chronic condition causing blockages in the arteries that feed the legs. This deprives leg muscles of oxygen and often causes debilitating pain. People with the disease are at greater risk of heart attacks, strokes and amputations. The pain sensation gets worse with walking, which then limits patients’ ability and desire to be active. Approximately 20 percent of Americans over 70 have the disease.

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expert-perspectives

Expert Perspective: U.S. lowers recommended fluoride in tap water

Photo: Steve Johnson, CC, https://flic.kr/p/aBotoC

The U.S. will lower nationwide recommendations for fluoride in tap water, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced last week. The pre-established range of 0.7-1.2 milligrams of fluoride per liter of water has been replaced with a national standard of 0.7 milligrams per liter.

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in-the-news

In the News: Bird Flu detected in Cooper’s Hawk

The new strain H5N2 of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), has killed more than 4 million turkeys and chickens in Minnesota, and affected 70 different farms throughout the state. The strain has been circulating in the Mississippi flyway since early March.

For the first time, researchers detected H5N2 in a wild bird. The Cooper’s hawk in Yellow Medicine County crashed into a window above the deck of a homeowner, Patrick Redig, D.V.M., Ph.D., College of Veterinary Medicine professor and co-founder of the Raptor Center, told the Star Tribune. Later, tests confirmed that the Cooper’s hawk was also positive for H5N2.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: Can laryngeal cancer survival differences be explained by pre-existing conditions or treatment types?

Photo courtesy Flickr user Super Fantastic

In a new study conducted by the University of Minnesota, researchers found that patients with early laryngeal cancer have greater survival outcomes if their treatment includes surgery, even when they adjusted for other medical problems and sociodemographics.

The research conducted by University of Minnesota otolaryngologist, Stephanie Misono, M.D., M.P.H. and health policy expert, Schelomo Marmor, Ph.D., in conjunction with Bevan Yueh, MD MPH in otolaryngology and senior author Beth A. Virnig PhD, was a follow up study to their prior work, in which they saw a difference in survival outcomes between patients treated with surgery vs patients treated with radiation for their early laryngeal cancer, leading them to investigate if other medical conditions or sociodemographic factors influenced those results.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: Large number of people are eligible for special enrollment periods, majority are uninsured

A study released online today in Health Affairs found there is a large number of people who are potentially eligible for special enrollment periods as part of federal and state Marketplace health insurance exchanges, and the majority are uninsured.

The study was led by Lacey Hartman, a senior research fellow at the State Health Access Data Assistance Center (SHADAC) in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota.

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expert-perspectives

Use Of E-Cigarettes Triples Among U.S. Teens

A new national survey confirmed indications e-cigarettes are now more popular among teenage students than traditional cigarettes and other forms of tobacco.

The study was conducted by the Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) National Youth Tobacco survey. Findings included the use of e-cigarettes has increased from 1.1 percent in 2013 to 3.9 percent in 2014 among middle school Children. The survey found the use among high school students almost tripled, from 4.5 percent to 13.4 percent. The numbers equivocate to 450,000 middle school users and 2 million high school stu

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