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Research Snapshot: Media coverage of Affordable Care Act implementation varied by region

The legend of Paul Bunyan and Babe the Blue Ox came to life in Minnesota last year, with MNsure advertisements featuring the mythical duo in a campaign titled, “The Land of 10,000 Reasons to get Health Insurance.”

Nine million dollars were spent on the Minnesota advertisements, which popped up on every medium from billboards to television. While some parts of the country experienced advertising and media coverage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) taking effect similar to Minnesota’s, other regions of the United States saw much more or much less coverage according to new research led by Sarah Gollust, Ph.D., assistant professor in the University of Minnesota School of Public Health.

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research-and-clinical-trials

University of Minnesota research finds ACA insurance expansions reduce health care spending burdens for young adults

A new study published today in the August issue of the journal Health Affairs by Ezra Golberstein, Ph.D., professor in the Division of Health Policy and Management at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, in collaboration with Susan Busch, Ph.D., of Yale University and Ellen Meara, Ph.D., of Dartmouth College, found the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) provision allowing young adults to stay on their parents’ insurance plans until they turn 26, was associated with significant reductions in the likelihood that young adults had to pay high out-of-pocket costs for health care.

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in-the-news

Number of uninsured Minnesotans falls by 40 percent, U of M report finds

The number of Minnesotans without health insurance fell by 40.6 percent between September 30, 2013 and May 1, 2014, according to a new report prepared by State Health Access Data Assistance Center (SHADAC) at the University of Minnesota.

The complete report is available on the SHADAC website.

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research-and-clinical-trials

U of M study: U.S. rates of uninsured kids on the decline

A new report compiled by the University of Minnesota’s State Health Access Data Assistance Center (SHADAC) shows the percentage of U.S. children who lack health insurance fell to 7.5 percent in 2012, the most recent year of data available. The percentage of uninsured children nationwide dropped from 9.7 percent in 2008.

The report also shows significant gains in coverage among children who historically have been most likely to be uninsured —including non-white and Hispanic children and kids in low-income families.

The report was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and appears on the SHADAC site.

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research-and-clinical-trials

U of M study shows people with mental health problems are more likely to be uninsured or to rely on public insurance

A new University of Minnesota study shows that people with mental health problems are more likely to be uninsured and rely on public insurance than people without mental health problems. The cost of mental health services continues to be a concern, especially for persons with serious mental health problems who are uninsured. Public insurance coverage, such as Medicaid or Medicare, generally provides people with mental health issues the most affordable means to access needed treatment.

With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), many more people with mental health problems will have access to health insurance – particularly in states, liked Minnesota, that have opted to expand their Medicaid programs – and people with mental health problems on public insurance have better access to care and lower cost barriers than the uninsured or those with private health insurance coverage.

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research-and-clinical-trials

U of M study shows a high level of unfamiliarity around health reform in Minnesota

A new University of Minnesota study shows that more than 60 percent of enrollees in Minnesota’s high-risk insurance pool define themselves as “somewhat” or “very unfamiliar” with health reform and the pending changes to their current health coverage stemming from the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

To increase enrollee understanding, the latest study suggests immediate implementation of targeted education and outreach efforts to address concerns and ensure a smooth transition of coverage in January 2014.

The new study, titled “Survey Of High-Risk Pool Enrollees Suggests That Targeted Transition Education and Outreach Should Begin Soon,” was led by Lynn Blewett, Ph.D., professor in the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health, Division of Health Policy & Management, and director of the State Health Access Data Assistance Center (SHADAC). The study will appear in the September issue of the journal Health Affairs.

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