Academic Health Center
Stay Connected
in-the-news

Number of uninsured Minnesotans falls by 40 percent, U of M report finds

The number of Minnesotans without health insurance fell by 40.6 percent between September 30, 2013 and May 1, 2014, according to a new report prepared by State Health Access Data Assistance Center (SHADAC) at the University of Minnesota.

The complete report is available on the SHADAC website.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

U of M study: U.S. rates of uninsured kids on the decline

A new report compiled by the University of Minnesota’s State Health Access Data Assistance Center (SHADAC) shows the percentage of U.S. children who lack health insurance fell to 7.5 percent in 2012, the most recent year of data available. The percentage of uninsured children nationwide dropped from 9.7 percent in 2008.

The report also shows significant gains in coverage among children who historically have been most likely to be uninsured —including non-white and Hispanic children and kids in low-income families.

The report was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and appears on the SHADAC site.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

U of M study shows people with mental health problems are more likely to be uninsured or to rely on public insurance

A new University of Minnesota study shows that people with mental health problems are more likely to be uninsured and rely on public insurance than people without mental health problems. The cost of mental health services continues to be a concern, especially for persons with serious mental health problems who are uninsured. Public insurance coverage, such as Medicaid or Medicare, generally provides people with mental health issues the most affordable means to access needed treatment.

With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), many more people with mental health problems will have access to health insurance – particularly in states, liked Minnesota, that have opted to expand their Medicaid programs – and people with mental health problems on public insurance have better access to care and lower cost barriers than the uninsured or those with private health insurance coverage.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

U of M study shows a high level of unfamiliarity around health reform in Minnesota

A new University of Minnesota study shows that more than 60 percent of enrollees in Minnesota’s high-risk insurance pool define themselves as “somewhat” or “very unfamiliar” with health reform and the pending changes to their current health coverage stemming from the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

To increase enrollee understanding, the latest study suggests immediate implementation of targeted education and outreach efforts to address concerns and ensure a smooth transition of coverage in January 2014.

The new study, titled “Survey Of High-Risk Pool Enrollees Suggests That Targeted Transition Education and Outreach Should Begin Soon,” was led by Lynn Blewett, Ph.D., professor in the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health, Division of Health Policy & Management, and director of the State Health Access Data Assistance Center (SHADAC). The study will appear in the September issue of the journal Health Affairs.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

U of M researchers find new health reform efforts could lead to a substantial increase in Medicaid participation

A new University of Minnesota analysis shows that the Affordable Care Act is likely to lead to a substantial increase in Medicaid participation among people who are currently eligible for Medicaid but not enrolled.

One impact of such enrollment – termed the “welcome-mat” effect – will be higher Medicaid spending and increased caseloads, even in states that do not expand their Medicaid programs as called for by the Affordable Care Act.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

SPH researchers find higher rates of obstetric interventions among privately insured women

United States hospital-based births covered by private insurance are associated with higher rates of obstetric intervention than births paid for by Medicaid, according to new research from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health.

The latest study was led by health policy researcher Katy B. Kozhimannil, Ph.D., M.P.A., who partnered with fellow University of Minnesota researchers Tetyana P. Shippee, Ph.D. and Beth A. Virnig, Ph.D., M.P.H., as well as UCare Minnesota health care analyst Olusola Adegoke, M.P.H., M.B.B.S, who worked on the study as a masters student at the School of Public Health.

The study appeared this week in the American Journal of Managed Care.

To arrive at their conclusion, the researchers studied the relationship between the primary payer and trends in hospital-based childbirth obstetric procedures, such as cesarean delivery and labor induction. They examined 6,717,486 births across the United States between the years 2002 – 2009.

Though obstetric intervention rates have increased over time for all births, the presence and type of health insurance affected the type of care women received during childbirth.

Read more