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in-the-news

D.C. Snowy Owl Soars on the Wings of Science

The physical reconditioning of a raptor patient like The Raptor Center’s snowy owl patient from Washington, D.C., prior to its release is an important step in patient rehabilitation. It must compliment the medical care provided and restore a raptor’s fitness to a level necessary for survival.

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patient-care

D.C. Snowy Owl Taken to The Raptor Center at the University of Minnesota for Care

The snowy owl reportedly hit by a bus in Washington, D.C., in late January 2014 recently arrived to The Raptor Center at the University of Minnesota for care.

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video-and-multimedia

Photos: 2013 Fall Raptor Release

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news-and-notes

The Raptor Center releases rehabilitated birds this Saturday

The Raptor Center at the University of Minnesota, the Carpenter St. Croix Valley Nature Center and the 3M Foundation invite you to observe as rehabilitated birds are released back to the wild during the Fall Raptor Release this Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The free and public family event will take place at the Carpenter St. Croix Valley Nature Center, 12805 St. Croix Trail S., Hastings, Minn. Activities for the day will include: orchard rides, children’s activities and opportunities to meet The Raptor Center’s winged ambassador education birds. Feel free to bring a lawn chair or blanket to enjoy the day’s events!

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news-and-notes

Peregrine chick banding at 33 S. 6th Street

Four chicks – three males and one female – were banded today at 33 S. 6th Street in downtown Minneapolis. Many of you might know how important this building is to the peregrine falcon restoration project.

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in-the-news

In the News: Duluth eagle recovers at The Raptor Center

Two adult bald eagles recently “talon-locked” during a mid-air battle in Duluth, Minn. and crash-landed on the Duluth International Airport tarmac. While one bird was able to fly away, the other was severely injured and was taken to The Raptor Center at the University of Minnesota for care.

Talon-locking is known to occur among eagles of the same sex during breeding territory battles and among male and female eagles during courtship.

The eagle cared for at The Raptor Center sustained puncture wounds from the second bird’s talons and is expected to recover.

Watch a KARE 11 video featuring The Raptor Center executive director Julia Ponder, D.V.M., and the bald eagle patient here.

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