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research-and-clinical-trials

Health Talk Recommends: Electrical stimulation helps paralyzed patients move once again

Neuroscientists may have broken new ground in the fight against paralysis.

In new research published today in the journal Brain, a collaborative team of researchers from the University of Louisville, the University of California-Los Angeles and the Pavlov Institute of Physiology in Russia outline how they used neuromodulation and epidural spinal cord stimulation to coax new signals from the brain to the legs of four patients previously paralyzed below the waist. Each patient’s paralysis was the result of spinal cord injury.

While the neuromodulation device was powered on and sending electrical signals down their spines, each man in the study was able to voluntarily move their limbs and support own weight. Each patient has even regained control of their bladder and bowels while regulating their own body temperature and blood pressure.

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research-and-clinical-trials

CMRR’s 10.5 Tesla imaging magnet project moves forward

Last December we took you inside the Center for Magnetic Resonance Research’s (CMRR) latest research project – an effort that will utilize the world’s largest imaging magnet to conduct groundbreaking brain research and human body imaging.

In case you missed it, in late 2013 the 110-ton 10.5 Tesla magnet made a spectacular month-long journey by boat across the Atlantic Ocean from England, through the Great Lakes, and finally made its way from Duluth, MN, to the University of Minnesota campus.

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expert-perspectives

Make the most out of Daylight Saving Time

This weekend, we spring ahead and lose an hour of sleep as part of Daylight Saving Time. For many people, this may create some problems only because they forgot to set their clock ahead before going to bed.

For those who tend to be night owls, shift workers, or who have sleep disorders, it can be more problematic. The additional loss of precious sleep can be a more substantial problem. When we are sleepy, we often don’t perform as well at work and are more likely to make mistakes and have car accidents.

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expert-perspectives

Sleep key component to athletic performance

The world’s best athletes are descending upon Sochi, Russia for the 2014 Olympic Winter Games. Every elite athlete looks for an edge against their competitors to improve their athletic performance but what if the answer was as simple as getting more sleep?

According to Michael Howell, M.D., a sleep expert within the Department of Neurology, that’s precisely what elite athletes excel at.

“The best athletes I’ve ever met are extremely good sleepers,” said Howell. “Although you may not think your brain is doing much during sleep, your brain is putting connections together and it is amplifying circuits that are important.”

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: Endovascular gene therapy is a viable drug delivery approach for Hurler’s syndrome

New research from the Department of Neurology at the University of Minnesota may help bolster new treatment approaches for Hurler’s syndrome.

In a recent study, U of M researchers compared the efficacy of endovascular vs. intracerebral ventricular delivery of a viral gene therapy vector in an animal model and found that endovascular gene therapy is a viable drug delivery approach for many brain diseases, including Hurler’s syndrome.

The latest research was led by Christopher Janson, M.D., a resident in the Department of Neurology at the University of Minnesota, and was recently published in the journal Neurosurgery.

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patient-care

U of M doctors taking new approach to children’s mental health care

Child psychologists at the University of Minnesota are pushing for more personalized mental healthcare. That is why Gerald August, Ph.D., and Abigail Gewirtz, Ph.D., made personalized mental health intervention programs the focus of the newly founded Center for Personalization Research in Children’s Mental Health.

Traditionally, evidence-based mental health interventions (EBPs) use a planned model in which composition and dosage are predetermined based on factors in the patient’s case. This approach has helped some, but it hasn’t worked to its full potential. In many cases, EBPs can be costly and burdensome…

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