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in-the-news

In the News: U of M research suggests exercise can help lower breast cancer risk

A study from the Department of Food Science and Nutrition at the University of Minnesota published earlier this year found a moderate exercise program to be highly beneficial for women at risk for breast cancer.

Researchers, led by Mindy Kurzer, Ph.D., professor and director of the University of Minnesota Healthy Foods, Healthy Lives Institute, divided several hundred premenopausal women into two groups. One remained sedentary, while the other exercised moderately five times a week for 16 weeks.

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research-and-clinical-trials

First pre-surgical breast cancer drug gets FDA approval

The FDA has just given approval to a biotech drug from Roche to be used as a pre-surgical treatment for one of the deadliest forms of breast cancer.

The drug, known as Perjeta, has doctors hoping they can shrink tumors earlier, making them easier to remove. This would allow more women to keep their breasts instead of pursuing a full mastectomy, as well as increase positive outcomes for patients…

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research-and-clinical-trials

U of M looks to new breast cancer drug to propel current research

Douglas Yee, M.D., a University of Minnesota Physicians breast cancer specialist and director of the Masonic Cancer Center appeared on Fox 9 earlier this week to discuss a new drug that combats breast cancer in its earliest stages, a major milestone for researchers and patients alike.

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news-and-notes

Dogsledding for a cure

For a third year, Ricq Pattay, a senior analyst and programmer with the Academic Health Center Information Systems, will participate in Mush for a Cure to raise funds for the National Breast Cancer Foundation…

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in-the-news

Masonic Cancer Center researchers discover enzyme behind breast cancer mutations

There was some very exciting news announced earlier this week from researchers at the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, that generated considerable attention throughout the scientific community and within the general public and national media.

Masonic Cancer Center researchers uncovered a human enzyme responsible for causing DNA mutations found in the majority of breast cancers. The discovery of this enzyme – called APOBEC3B – may change the way breast cancer is diagnosed and treated.

The findings from a team of researchers led by Reuben Harris, Ph.D., associate professor of biochemistry, molecular biology and biophysics and a researcher within the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, are published in the latest edition of Nature.

“We strongly believe this discovery will change the way mutations in cancer are viewed and, hopefully, it will allow cancer researchers to develop new treatment approaches that can prevent these mutations before they become harmful,” said Harris.

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education

AHC Gamechangers: Douglas Yee

At some point in their life, one in seven women will be affected by breast cancer.  Second only to skin cancer as the most common cancer in women, more than 200,000 new cases of breast cancer will diagnosed in women each year in the United States.

AHC Gamechanger Douglas Yee, M.D., a University of Minnesota Physicians breast cancer specialist and director of the Masonic Cancer Center, has dedicated his career to the battle against breast cancer – a condition that he himself has only a one percent lifetime risk of developing.

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