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research-and-clinical-trials

CTSI research project addresses food insecurity in MN

Researchers from the University of Minnesota and Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota are collaborating on a study that explores a new approach for connecting food insecure families with food and nutrition resources, thanks to funding from CTSI, Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, and the University’s Department of Pediatrics.

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expert-perspectives

Expert perspective: New sleep guidelines for children announced

Sleep is critical to the overall growth and development of infants, children and teens. But how much sleep is enough? The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Sleep Medicine recently released a set of guidelines that outlines how much sleep children should be receiving at different ages.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: physical activity may decrease fatigue, support development in young cancer patients

Children undergoing cancer treatment often experience fatigue. Researchers are now investigating whether maintaining a level of physical activity during treatment and recovery may ease symptoms. Having more energy can support a child’s healthy growth and development during and after cancer.

That’s why Casey Hooke, Ph.D., APRN, assistant professor in the University of Minnesota School of Nursing, and member of the Masonic Cancer Center, is dedicated to finding ways to help children have more energy during cancer treatments.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: Choline supplement shows small gains in memory performance for kids with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) affect more than two percent of the population, yet there is little physicians know of that can be done to help improve the brain damage those children suffer. Utilizing a choline supplement after birth for children with FASDs could be a potential option, a University of Minnesota Medical School clinical trial found.

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expert-perspectives

Commentary: School of Public Health associate professor reflects on the importance of physical education in our school systems

The following commentary was presented in December 2014 to the Minneapolis Public Schools Board of Education by Toben Nelson, Sc.D., associate professor in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota regarding graduation requirements for physical education.

“Developing minds and bodies need to be active in order to function at their best. I am here to urge you to reconsider the decision to reduce the number of physical education (PE) credits that students must take in order to graduate from a Minneapolis public school.

In my view, reducing physical education requirements is actually counter-productive to educational goals. Physical activity is critical for physical health. But it has a wide range of other benefits. Regular activity promotes mental health, reduces anxiety and depression, and improves mood. When schools provide structured time for physical activity through physical education, students respond with improved academic performance in the classroom and on standardized test scores.

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nutrition

Make a plan, but consider balance when it comes to Halloween candy

One of the biggest candy days of the year is upon us, and parents and kids alike are trying to strike an accord on how much candy will be consumed in the coming days.

How much, really, is too much? And is there a magic formula families should follow to ensure the Halloween stash doesn’t lead to bigger problems later on?

According to pediatric dietician Laura Gearman, M.S., R.D., L.D., with the University of Minnesota Masonic Children’s Hospital, it’s a good idea to make a plan ahead of time and discuss it as a family but there’s no one-size-fits-all approach to Halloween candy consumption.

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