Academic Health Center
Stay Connected
research-and-clinical-trials

CMRR’s 10.5 Tesla imaging magnet project moves forward

Last December we took you inside the Center for Magnetic Resonance Research’s (CMRR) latest research project – an effort that will utilize the world’s largest imaging magnet to conduct groundbreaking brain research and human body imaging.

In case you missed it, in late 2013 the 110-ton 10.5 Tesla magnet made a spectacular month-long journey by boat across the Atlantic Ocean from England, through the Great Lakes, and finally made its way from Duluth, MN, to the University of Minnesota campus.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

How do you move a 110-ton imaging magnet?

That is probably a question you don’t hear too often but that’s precisely what researchers and staff at the University of Minnesota’s Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) were asking recently when they needed to move the 110-ton imaging magnet from Duluth, Minn. to the University.

The Agilent Technologies magnet is the world’s first 10.5 Tesla whole body human magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) magnet and will be used to aid in brain research and human body imaging.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

World’s largest imaging magnet arrives at the U of M’s Center for Magnetic Resonance Research

The University of Minnesota’s Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) is now home to the world’s largest imaging magnet after its arrival to the University on Friday, December 6.

The Agilent Technologies magnet is the world’s first 10.5 Tesla whole body human magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) magnet. Tesla is a unit of measurement that describes the strength of magnetic field. By comparison, most medical MRIs utilize magnets are rated 1.5 – 3 Tesla or lower.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

University of Minnesota magnetic resonance research aims to shed new light on Friedreich’s ataxia

“When I was diagnosed with Friedreich’s ataxia at the age of 17, it was a big blow for me and my family,” said Kyle Bryant, Friedreich’s ataxia (FA) spokesperson and advocate. “We had no treatment, no cure and no hope.”

For people with Friedreich’s ataxia, like Bryant, FA affects the entire family and support system. This rare, debilitating, life-shortening, degenerative neuro-muscular disorder often confines its patients to wheelchairs for the rest of their lives amongst other serious physical issues including diabetes mellitus, vision impairment and aggressive scoliosis.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: U of M study finds NAC boosts brain and blood glutathione in patients with Parkinson’s and Gaucher’s diseases

In a new study recently published in Clinical Neuropharmacology, University of Minnesota researchers tried to determine if N-acetylcysteine (NAC), administered via an intravenous infusion, can alter peripheral blood and brain chemistry in patients with Parkinson’s and Gaucher disease as determined through blood assays and brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS).

University researchers Paul Tuite, M.D., associate professor in the Department of Neurology, James Cloyd, Pharm.D., professor in the Department of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, and Gulin Oz, Ph.D., associate professor of radiology at the Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) all partnered on the project.

Read more
in-the-news

Health Talk Recommends: President Obama seeks $100 million to map the human brain

Yesterday President Obama announced that he has asked Congress to spend $100 million next year on a new project to map the human brain in hopes of finding cures for Alzheimer’s disease, epilepsy and traumatic injuries.

This national initiative has local ties to the University of Minnesota. Kamil Ugurbil, Ph.D., director of the Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR), was at the White House for the announcement.

Ugurbil is one of 15 people on the working group that will develop the scientific strategy for the BRAIN Initiative, which stands for Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies.

Read more