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research-and-clinical-trials

Advanced imaging technology aiding in prostate cancer screenings

According to the American Cancer Society, prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men after skin cancer. Despite the grim reality of a positive cancer diagnosis, prostate cancer can often be treated effectively if discovered early.

At the Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) at the University of Minnesota, researchers are utilizing robust magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology to better diagnose and follow patients with prostate cancer.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: Imaging technology aiding in stroke research

According to the CDC, stroke is a leading cause of death, killing 130,000 Americans each year and the number one cause of long-term disability. The statistics are grim, and a clear sign that more progress is needed across a number of promising research areas.

At the University of Minnesota, experts think advances in imaging may be key to unlocking some of the secrets to earlier detection of stroke and more effective testing to determine which patients are at risk of suffering the condition.

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research-and-clinical-trials

CMRR’s 10.5 Tesla imaging magnet project moves forward

Last December we took you inside the Center for Magnetic Resonance Research’s (CMRR) latest research project – an effort that will utilize the world’s largest imaging magnet to conduct groundbreaking brain research and human body imaging.

In case you missed it, in late 2013 the 110-ton 10.5 Tesla magnet made a spectacular month-long journey by boat across the Atlantic Ocean from England, through the Great Lakes, and finally made its way from Duluth, MN, to the University of Minnesota campus.

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research-and-clinical-trials

How do you move a 110-ton imaging magnet?

That is probably a question you don’t hear too often but that’s precisely what researchers and staff at the University of Minnesota’s Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) were asking recently when they needed to move the 110-ton imaging magnet from Duluth, Minn. to the University.

The Agilent Technologies magnet is the world’s first 10.5 Tesla whole body human magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) magnet and will be used to aid in brain research and human body imaging.

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research-and-clinical-trials

World’s largest imaging magnet arrives at the U of M’s Center for Magnetic Resonance Research

The University of Minnesota’s Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) is now home to the world’s largest imaging magnet after its arrival to the University on Friday, December 6.

The Agilent Technologies magnet is the world’s first 10.5 Tesla whole body human magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) magnet. Tesla is a unit of measurement that describes the strength of magnetic field. By comparison, most medical MRIs utilize magnets are rated 1.5 – 3 Tesla or lower.

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research-and-clinical-trials

University of Minnesota magnetic resonance research aims to shed new light on Friedreich’s ataxia

“When I was diagnosed with Friedreich’s ataxia at the age of 17, it was a big blow for me and my family,” said Kyle Bryant, Friedreich’s ataxia (FA) spokesperson and advocate. “We had no treatment, no cure and no hope.”

For people with Friedreich’s ataxia, like Bryant, FA affects the entire family and support system. This rare, debilitating, life-shortening, degenerative neuro-muscular disorder often confines its patients to wheelchairs for the rest of their lives amongst other serious physical issues including diabetes mellitus, vision impairment and aggressive scoliosis.

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