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research-and-clinical-trials

New compound shows promise in treating chronic pain

A new compound in development at the University of Minnesota shows promise as a breakthrough drug for treating chronic pain.

The new compound, developed by Philip Portoghese, Ph.D., of the University of Minnesota’s College of Pharmacy, appears to be the first of its kind. A patent has been applied for, and the University’s Center for Translational Medicine has been conducting proof-of-concept studies. As a potential medication, the compound offers benefits lacked by current medications: It does not induce the body to develop tolerance or dependence, as opioid painkillers do. It is more potent than other opioid pain medications. It reduces and inhibits neuropathic pain, post-operative pain, burn pain, spinal injury pain and inflammation.

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education

50 years out: Will your genes define your Rx?

Tylenol should relieve pain, cough suppressants should ease cough and serious ailments should reliably respond to vital medication. But when a prescribed medicine doesn’t do its intended job, it can be difficult to decide who or what is to blame.

It doesn’t help that sometimes the problem doesn’t lie within the medicine or the doctor; it can lie within your genes.

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research-and-clinical-trials

U of M health sciences researchers achieve greatness every day

Every day, more than 1,500 amazing men and women help grow the health sciences programs at the University of Minnesota. These are the faculty of the six schools and colleges that make up the Academic Health Center (AHC), and each has a story to tell.

Through a new video series titled “Every Day,” the AHC is taking viewers inside the lives of our faculty. Just like middle school teachers with a life outside the classroom, our researchers and physicians live exciting lives outside their daily work at the university. Rather than simply profiling their research or clinical specialties, we focus instead on what drives them to make the world a better place.

In this video series, our experts leave their office walls behind and welcome viewers into their personal lives. We encourage you to watch how these researchers better themselves and the world we share together, every day.

Watch the videos here

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u-of-m-voices

How pharmacy education differs from U.S. to Germany

Editor’s note: Ashley Artmann is a doctor of pharmacy student at the University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy. To document her five-week rotation in Germany, Artmann is blogging about her experiences learning about German pharmacy education and practice. Find this and additional posts from Artmann at aeartma.blogspot.com.

Last Tuesday we ventured via bus and train in the rain to Düsseldorf to visit their university and pharmacy school.

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patient-care

Epilepsy drug lamotrigine use in pregnancy: fewer doctor visits ahead?

For women with epilepsy, controlling health-threatening seizures is especially important during a pregnancy.

Taking the right dose of medicine can be key… and challenging.

As a baby grows, a pregnant woman’s body weight must also grow to support her baby. Consequently, a pregnant woman may require more medication to keep seizures at bay than she did pre-pregnancy. Pregnant women with epilepsy regularly visit the doctor to have blood drawn and adjust their antiepilepsy medicine dosage.

Now, new data analyses from the University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy and Harvard Medical School find one fifth of pregnant women may someday be able to control seizures with fewer visits to the doctor.

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expert-perspectives

U of M expert: With codeine abuse on the rise, it’s important to remember regulation can work to curb misuse

Over the past few months, recreational use of codeine cough syrup has captured national headlines as abuse of the combination cough suppressant/antihistamine has climbed among adolescents. The coverage intensified when pop music star Justin Bieber was linked to the drug by the media last month.

Ingredients for a codeine/promethazine cocktail popularized by the rap industry as “sizzurp,” “lean” and “purple drank” were reportedly found during a police search of the star’s home in late January.

David Ferguson, Ph.D., a pharmacology and drugs of abuse expert from the University of Minnesota’s College of Pharmacy is surprised to see the drug making headlines again.

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