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in-the-news

Educational activities to replace bird exhibitions at the 2015 Minnesota State Fair

Earlier this Spring, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) hit Minnesota affecting more than 100 farms and more than 9 million poultry and birds across the state were killed. Animal health officials decided to close poultry exhibits at a variety of events including the 2015 Minnesota State Fair, leaving fair-goers and 4H members disappointed, but the decision will minimize the risk of spreading the virus further.  

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research-and-clinical-trials

Veterinary Researchers on Front Line against Antibiotic Resistance

The College of Veterinary Medicine is on the front line of attack against the growing worldwide public health threat of bacterial infections in humans and animals that are resistant to antibiotics. With the support of a $2.25 million grant from USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA),  UMN veterinary researchers are investigating way to minimize antibiotic resistance through the poultry production system.

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beyond-minnesota

Tuning into Social Networks to Prevent and Contain Disease

As the College of Veterinary Medicine’s first and only disease ecologist, Meggan Craft, Ph.D., is a pioneer in the study of how disease spreads through animal populations. She has used mathematical models to track the spread of distemper in African lions and is currently working on a five-year collaborative project to discover what types of mountain lion contacts lead to the transmission of infectious disease.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: Antibiotics and Bacterial Resistance in Food Animals

Out of concern over the growing number of antibiotic resistant bacteria, federal policymakers will phase out the practice of giving food animals low-doses of antibiotics to promote growth. In an effort to discover whether science backs up the potential policy change, Associate Professor in Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences at the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) Tim Johnson, Ph.D., studied the issue.

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in-the-news

In the News: Bird Flu detected in Cooper’s Hawk

The new strain H5N2 of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), has killed more than 4 million turkeys and chickens in Minnesota, and affected 70 different farms throughout the state. The strain has been circulating in the Mississippi flyway since early March.

For the first time, researchers detected H5N2 in a wild bird. The Cooper’s hawk in Yellow Medicine County crashed into a window above the deck of a homeowner, Patrick Redig, D.V.M., Ph.D., College of Veterinary Medicine professor and co-founder of the Raptor Center, told the Star Tribune. Later, tests confirmed that the Cooper’s hawk was also positive for H5N2.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Disease transmission among humans, animals affects chimpanzee conservation in Tanzania

The spread of disease from animal to human is no new phenomenon; the bubonic plague spread through rat fleas, Rabies normally transfers through animal bites and Ebola has commonly been linked to bats. It’s called zoonosis: when a disease from an infected animal population spills over to humans.

But pathogens can spread both ways. Humans can pass diseases to animals, too (called anthropozoonosis).

Cryptosporidiosis, commonly called Crypto, is one such disease taking a particular toll on chimpanzees within Gombe Stream National Park in Tanzania. A thorough analysis of the epidemiology of cryptosporidium – the parasite that causes Crypto – recently published in PLOS One, reveals the complexities of disease transmission in the Gombe ecosystem. The discovery could have broader implications on wildlife and chimpanzee conservation models.

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