Academic Health Center
Stay Connected
expert-perspectives

U of M Expert Perspectives: The problem with wipes, or how to protect delicate skin

A report out of the University of Connecticut School of Medicine is causing chatter in parenting groups nationwide, but for dermatologists, the findings simply confirm what they’ve been saying all along.

Preservatives in baby wipes may be causing skin reactions, and parents should limit exposure of these types of chemicals to a child’s skin.

HealthTalk spoke with Ingrid Polcari, M.D., assistant professor in the Department of Dermatology and a practicing pediatric dermatologist, for more.

Read more
video-and-multimedia

Tips for avoiding summer burns

After a long winter, many folks are eager to enjoy the sunshine and outdoor activities that come with summer. Ingrid Polcari, M.D., an assistant professor in the University of Minnesota Department of Dermatology, offers some tips to Health Talk readers on how to avoid sun as well as sunburns and thermal burns.

Read more
expert-perspectives

Sunscreen 101

Winter is over, the sun is shining and across the country and it’s pleasant enough to roll down the windows, break out your favorite pair of shorts and sandals and get outside.

But before you head out for a day of fun in the sun, you may want to take note of some recent changes to the label on your sunscreen bottle…

Read more
beyond-minnesota

U of M and Brazilian researchers partner to fight infectious disease

It’s difficult to treat a disease caused by something you don’t know is there.

That’s why Marna Ericson, Ph.D. in the Department of Dermatology and Center for Drug Design at the University of Minnesota’s Medical School and Paulo Velho, M.D., Ph.D., a researcher from the University of Campinas (UNICAMP) in Campinas, Brazil are combining experience and expertise internationally to learn more about the hard-to-detect bacteria Bartonella.

Read more
in-the-news

New skin cancer study highlights U of M tanning bed research

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic have found melanoma rates among young women are eight-times higher than they were 40 years ago. Though the study didn’t look at what caused the melanoma, researchers suggested indoor tanning as the main factor.

Citing a University of Minnesota study that found a strong correlation between tanning-device use and melanoma, the Mayo Clinic researchers said they are sure that ultra-violet radiation is linked to cancer in a big way, especially tanning bed exposure.

Read more