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6 tips for dogs and fireworks this Fourth of July

For most Americans, the Fourth of July is a time for fun, celebration and laughter. However, for our furry four-legged pets, the holiday can be a time of high stress and anxiety.

According to a recent article by the New York Times, at least 40 percent of dogs experience noise anxiety, which is most prevalent during the summer.

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beyond-minnesota

Vaccination program for pet dogs may not fully prevent lion infections in Serengeti

In June 2014, Health Talk first shared that a virus carried by domestic dogs is threatening the health of wild cats like the Serengeti lion. Now, in an update to that research, new findings led by the University of Glasgow and co-authored by the University of Minnesota suggest vaccinating domestic dogs against this virus, known as canine distemper, is not enough to keep Serengeti lions and their cohabitants, the endangered African wild dog, safe from infection.

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news-and-notes

What’s yours is mine … dog germs included

Dog owners and their canine counterparts share more than just love, living space and the occasional bite of food.

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beyond-minnesota

Is the biggest threat to wild cats … dogs? The research is in.

Big cat populations including the Amur tiger and Amur leopard are in jeopardy of extinction. Fewer than 550 Amur tigers and leopards remain in the wilderness of China and the Russian Far East today. Alongside threats posed by changing climates and human pressures, is another threat to cats that may sound familiar: dogs.

That’s right. A virus carried by the domestic dog may be one of the biggest threats to endangered wild felids like the Amur tiger.

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research-and-clinical-trials

For dogs, sole gene doesn’t equate to cancer

If you’re a dog lover, we have some good news. It turns out that a better understanding of the mechanisms behind aging and cancer could reduce the number of canines over the age of 10 that die from cancer each year. A better understanding of those same mechanisms may even yield big news for humans down the road.

Recently, University of Minnesota researchers made a surprising discovery about one gene implicated in canine aging. Their finding centered around a gene known as “TERT.”

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research-and-clinical-trials

Kidney stone insight in dogs could boost relief for humans, too

Chances are, you know someone who’s had a kidney stone. The rock-like masses of calcium oxalate can be painful – and worse, can come back time and time again. As many as one in 10 people will develop a kidney stone during their lifetime.

Today, scientists know the biggest risk factor for kidney stones is genetics. However, just which genes passed from parent to child can claim responsibility for yielding the stones down the road isn’t yet known.

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