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Global is local: Viewing health issues at a community level

People often look at global health from a narrow perspective. “Global” is categorized by location – meaning, outside the U.S. and conjures up images of humanitarian responses to poverty and suffering somewhere else in the world.

But that shouldn’t be the approach, says Michael Westerhaus, M.D., an assistant professor in the Medical School and adjunct professor in the School of Public Health. Global and local health are very closely connected.

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expert-perspectives

Essential oils safety: You may be using them wrong

When it comes to essential oils, there’s no shortage of health claims – from weight loss to immune system fortification and renewed mental clarity. But one thing’s certain: you’re probably using them wrong.

Health Talk explored myths surrounding aromatherapy, essential oils safety and identified some do’s and don’ts for integrating them into your care.

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research-and-clinical-trials

SPH study shows importance of caregiver’s role in fostering academic success among African American youth

New research from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health finds academic success of African American youth is associated with their access to resources for resilience. African American children who perceive high support from their caregivers and utilize more adaptive coping strategies may perform better academically.

The study, led by School of Public Health graduate and predoctoral student, Ashley Chesmore, M.P.H., recruited 46 African American children aged 8-12 years. Data was collected by  Principal Investigator and associate professor, Sonya Brady, Ph.D., on the children’s resources for resilience such as coping skills and perceived support of caregivers. This data was combined with the children’s progress reports and recent standardized tests.

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beyond-minnesota

Uganda Hub fosters global health research collaborations, education and engagement with African partners

Tackling the devastating effects of global health phenomenon is central to the work of health scientists and educators around the globe. No place is their work more critical than in Africa where the onslaught of deadly epidemics like HIV/AIDS and Ebola, coupled with worsening environmental crises such as climate change and food scarcity, have affected generations of people and challenged leading scientists for decades.

That’s why the University of Minnesota and Makerere University in Uganda partnered to establish the Uganda Hub of Innovation.

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expert-perspectives

UMN Experts: How to talk about dying

Dying is an uncomfortable topic of conversation. No one wants to bring it up, not even our doctors. Unfortunately, this leads to miscommunication about how a person wants to die.

In fact, about 7 in 10 Americans would prefer to die at home, but only about a quarter of them actually do.

“There is a fundamental disconnect between what happens and what we want, and that stems from a lack of communication about dying,” says Frank Bennett, MDiv., senior fellow in the University of Minnesota Center for Spirituality & Healing and former hospital chaplain and minister. “Most care providers frame the conversation around therapeutic interventions, because that’s their focus, but patients think in terms of goals, hopes and fears.”

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news-and-notes

Accreditation of dental therapy will set national standards

The Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA), the sole group tasked by the U.S. Department of Education with accrediting dental education and dental-related programs, voted to accredit dental therapy education in the U.S. (Background on dental therapy)

Currently, dental therapists are approved and licensed to practice in MaineMinnesota and Alaskan tribal communities, but their education programs are not accredited. Minnesota was the first state to license dental therapists (in 2011), and the University of Minnesota is the only dental school to educate dental therapists.

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