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research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: Race simulation testing recommended for runners with recurrent heat stroke

It’s no surprise that athletes are at risk for heat stroke during the blazing summer months; however, a recent case study from the University of Minnesota demonstrates that exertional heat stroke (EHS), a form of heat-induced illness, could still be life-threatening to athletes in cooler temperatures.

The research investigated a 30-year-old distance runner with a history of recurrent heat strokes while racing. A unique circumstance in relatively cool weather triggered a more extensive examination for cause, says William Roberts, M.D., author of the study from the Department of Family Medicine & Community Health in the University of Minnesota Medical School. The runner suffered from EHS despite the cooler temperature, highlighting the importance of race simulation testing for return-to-activity among athletes with a history of EHS.

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expert-perspectives

From tick to sick: the search for a Lyme disease diagnosis

A blacklegged tick, just the size of a poppy seed, perches on the tip of a leaf. It stands poised with its limbs outstretched, ready to latch onto its next prey.

It’s barely noticeable, but looks essentially harmless; just another tiny bug that will leave itchy red bumps up and down your legs. But that bite carries a greater threat: Lyme disease.

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expert-perspectives

Expert Perspective: Do workout devices that monitor activity actually motivate people to exercise?

Lately, it may seem impossible to visit the gym without spotting someone sporting a Fitbit, Garmin watch or some sort of exercise tracking device. As the newest exercise accessories help make logging workouts a breeze, Health Talk spoke with Bill Roberts, M.D., from the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, and Jean Abraham, Ph.D., from the School of Public Health, to determine which workout devices and incentives motivate people to get off the couch and on their feet.

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expert-perspectives

Sedentary lifestyle, not shoveling itself, contributes to health hazards

This probably isn’t news to you but shoveling that wet, heavy snow can be a real pain in the neck, err back. Unfortunately, some people have experienced that shoveling snow has led to aches, pains and in some severe instances heart attacks.

And while true in certain cases, the problem isn’t solely dependent upon the snow shoveling activity itself but rather the sedentary lifestyle that some of these people live.

Shoveling is a lot of work and you do use a lot of muscles in your legs, arms and back which places extra strain on your heart.

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expert-perspectives

Summer safety tips: Hydration is a must

This summer you might be planning to get outside and partake in a variety of fun activities. But whether you’re planning to hike, play bocce ball or just relax in the water, it’s important that you stay safe and stay hydrated.

William Roberts, M.D., professor with the University of Minnesota Medical School, Family Medicine and Community Health, is here to offer his summer safety tips for staying hydrated:

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expert-perspectives

5 health tips every dad should know

With Father’s Day right around the corner, Health Talk is putting the focus on dads this week.

With the help of William Roberts, M.D., professor with the University of Minnesota Medical School, Family Medicine and Community Health, Health Talk compiled a list of essential health tips for dad to help keep him healthy for a long time.

Roberts’ health tips for dad are:

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