Academic Health Center
Stay Connected
in-the-news

Number of uninsured Minnesotans falls by 40 percent, U of M report finds

The number of Minnesotans without health insurance fell by 40.6 percent between September 30, 2013 and May 1, 2014, according to a new report prepared by State Health Access Data Assistance Center (SHADAC) at the University of Minnesota.

The complete report is available on the SHADAC website.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

U of M study: U.S. rates of uninsured kids on the decline

A new report compiled by the University of Minnesota’s State Health Access Data Assistance Center (SHADAC) shows the percentage of U.S. children who lack health insurance fell to 7.5 percent in 2012, the most recent year of data available. The percentage of uninsured children nationwide dropped from 9.7 percent in 2008.

The report also shows significant gains in coverage among children who historically have been most likely to be uninsured —including non-white and Hispanic children and kids in low-income families.

The report was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and appears on the SHADAC site.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

U of M study shows people with mental health problems are more likely to be uninsured or to rely on public insurance

A new University of Minnesota study shows that people with mental health problems are more likely to be uninsured and rely on public insurance than people without mental health problems. The cost of mental health services continues to be a concern, especially for persons with serious mental health problems who are uninsured. Public insurance coverage, such as Medicaid or Medicare, generally provides people with mental health issues the most affordable means to access needed treatment.

With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), many more people with mental health problems will have access to health insurance – particularly in states, liked Minnesota, that have opted to expand their Medicaid programs – and people with mental health problems on public insurance have better access to care and lower cost barriers than the uninsured or those with private health insurance coverage.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

Men cut back on needed health care after switching to high-deductible health plans

A new collaborative research effort has found that after employers switch to high-deductible health plans (HDHP), men make fewer emergency room visits for even severe problems, which may lead to a later increase in hospitalization rates.

The results, published online today in Medical Care stem from a new project that includes researchers from the University of Minnesota, Harvard Medical School, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute and the University of British Columbia.

HDHPs are the fastest growing health insurance plans in the United States, featuring lower premiums with higher annual deductibles, which members typically pay out of pocket. Until now, research examining some of the downstream impacts of HDHPs has been limited. The latest analysis was designed to examine possible unintended consequences of HDHPs.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

U of M researchers find wide variation in cesarean delivery rates among U.S. hospitals

Cesarean delivery is the most common surgery in the United States, performed on 1.67 million American women annually. Yet hospital cesarean rates vary widely according to new research from the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health.

The latest study, appearing today in Health Affairs, shows that cesarean delivery rates varied tenfold across U.S. hospitals, from 7.1 percent to 69.9 percent.
Read more