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expert-perspectives

New sugar recommendations are bittersweet

What do sweet and sour chicken, fruit yogurt, and pasta sauces have in common? It may surprise you, but all of these pre-packaged foods typically contain more than your recommended daily amount of sugar.

According to new draft guidelines published by the World Health Organization (WHO), people should try and limit the amount of sugar they consume to 5 percent of their daily calorie intake. But if 5 percent is too difficult, the WHO has determined that to avoid weight gain and minimize risk of diseases like diabetes, absolutely no more than 10 percent of a person’s daily calorie intake should be made up of sugar.

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research-and-clinical-trials

The public and science go ‘nuts’ over the Mediterranean diet

Last month, Health Talk highlighted the best and worst diets for 2014 as determined by U.S. News & World Report. Once again, the Mediterranean diet was among the top overall diets, coming in tied at #3. Now, a new study by the Harvard School of Public Health has added some additional fuel to the Mediterranean diet fire.

The study tracked 780 male Midwestern firefighters over the age of 18 and concluded that firefighters who closely followed the Mediterranean diet had fewer risk factors for heart disease than those who did not eat this diet.

The good news for the public is you don’t have to be a firefighter to reap the benefits of the Mediterranean diet.

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expert-perspectives

Norovirus: The worst kind of cruise ship stowaway

Imagine lounging under sunny skies aboard a cruise ship sailing through the clear blue waters of the Caribbean. Sounds great, right? Except now imagine that 700 of your fellow passengers are all violently ill. Yeah, that changes things a bit.

The Explorer of the Seas, Royal Caribbean’s ill-fated cruise ship, returned to port yesterday following an outbreak of norovirus among at least 630 passengers and 54 crew members. Those numbers are an unfortunate record among cruise ships over the last 20 years for the highest number of ill passengers.

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expert-perspectives

Expert perspective: One simple and inexpensive way to promote healthier options at meal time

A little game of red light, green light may help you make better choices when building your meal, according to new research published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

The study, based out of Massachusetts General Hospital, tracked food choices in the hospital cafeteria over two years. During that time, small signs were placed on menus in green, yellow and red to indicate the healthful (green) or unhealthful (red) options. The cafeterias were also redesigned to keep healthier options easy to spot and grab.

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expert-perspectives

When science takes a U-turn: the peanut allergy edition

So…if you thought pregnancy + peanut butter = a child with a nut allergy, it turns out the math doesn’t quite add up. New research now suggests pregnant women who eat peanuts or tree nuts are actually less likely to give birth to children with nut allergies than women who avoid eating peanuts or tree nuts.

If it feels like another tree of conventional wisdom just fell in the internet’s dark forest of health information, we know. But scientific data can be hard to debate.

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nutrition

Study: Coupons favor wallet, not our health

Are you planning to go to the grocery store this week? If you’re like most Americans, chances are you’ll grab some coupons before heading out the door. Unfortunately, a new study published in the journal Preventing Chronic Disease unveiled that what you may save in money will likely cost you in nutrition.

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