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Small steps for big changes in 2015

As January comes to a close, many find the resolutions they made on New Year’s Day, are becoming harder to maintain. Before you throw out your resolution to be healthy in 2015, HealthTalk compiled a short list of easy steps you can take to achieve your goals.

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in-the-news

In the News: Complaining less could mean cooking more

Looking to boost your attendance at family dinner and keep things healthy at the same time? A new  Washington Post article shows trying to please everyone could be leading to a big boost in unhealthy picks for supper fare.

It’s no secret family meals have big benefits; from healthier weight levels to lower risks of alcohol and drug abuse, study after study cite countless reasons for us to pull up a chair.

A North Carolina State University study of home cooking interviewed 150 mothers and observed 40 of their family dinners. They found that in all the meals observed, most families complained about the food at least once.

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news-and-notes

Mindful eating during the holidays

Thanksgiving: A time to be thankful, and oftentimes a time to overeat. No one wants to skip one of the biggest meals of the year, but keeping a mindful approach to eating can be tricky.

“The key is finding balance and making conscious choices,” said Mary Jo Kreitzer, Ph.D., R.N., founder and director of the University of Minnesota’s Center for Spirituality & Healing.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Can this drug for Tylenol overdose make inroads with Type 1 diabetes?

A low-cost Tylenol overdose drug already available for cystic fibrosis use will soon enter clinical trials aimed at discovering whether it can aid in treating an additional condition: Type 1 diabetes.

The drug, a natural supplement, is thought to have potential use in the treatment of hypoglycemia, a condition in which too little blood sugar is present in the body.

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in-the-news

U of M study reveals kids exposed to more fat shaming comments on TV than adults

In a general sense, children’s television has a reputation for being politically correct, however, a new study reveals television aimed at kids contains just as many, if not more, weight-stigmatizing, or fat shaming, conversations.

The study led by Marla Eisenberg Sc.D., M.P.H., an epidemiologist at the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health, was recently published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders. Eisenberg analyzed the content of more than 30 episodes of popular kid shows and identified the number of weight-stigmatizing incidents.

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news-and-notes

7 healthy back-to-school tips

Back-to-school season in Minnesota is here.

But before the kids head off to class, Cheri Friedrich, D.N.P., R.N., a nurse practitioner who cares for children and is a clinical assistant professor at the University of Minnesota School of Nursing, has a few last-minute reminders to share.

Seven tips for back-to-school:

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