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expert-perspectives

Sedentary lifestyle, not shoveling itself, contributes to health hazards

This probably isn’t news to you but shoveling that wet, heavy snow can be a real pain in the neck, err back. Unfortunately, some people have experienced that shoveling snow has led to aches, pains and in some severe instances heart attacks.

And while true in certain cases, the problem isn’t solely dependent upon the snow shoveling activity itself but rather the sedentary lifestyle that some of these people live.

Shoveling is a lot of work and you do use a lot of muscles in your legs, arms and back which places extra strain on your heart.

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patient-care

University of Minnesota surgeons unveil new hybrid OR

Earlier today, surgeons from University of Minnesota Heart at Fairview performed a complex endovascular aneurysm repair that demonstrated the technology and capabilities of a new hybrid operating room at the University of Minnesota Medical Center, Fairview, that integrates vascular surgery, cardiology, interventional radiology, cardiac surgery and anesthesia services.

The room, developed in partnership with Philips Healthcare, is a unique combination; part endoscopy suite and part operating room that offers unparalleled technology including:

  • An integration of technologies that allows for 70 percent less radiation exposure to patients and clinical providers during X-ray based procedures
  • A Philips Flexmove x-ray beam mounting system that allows for better beam positioning
  • A complete compliment of ultrasound and echo technology, as well as the ability to display a patient’s previous CT and MRI images, allowing for improved disease targeting and a reduction or elimination of some surgical incisions.
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patient-care

Positivity and physical activity remain key in the fight against cardiovascular disease

Two recent studies have armed cardiologists with even more evidence that a positive mindset and physical activity can reduce the risk and impact of cardiovascular disease.

First, in late September researchers from Tillburg University in the Netherlands announced results of a new study that found positivity might go a long way in helping people survive manage their heart disease.

Then, in a second study published earlier this month in the British Medical Journal, a research team comprised of experts from the London School of EconomicsHarvard Medical School and the Stanford University School of Medicine found that physical activity and exercise was often as effective as medical intervention in managing conditions like heart disease, heart failure and pre-diabetes.

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expert-perspectives

U of M expert perspective: Understanding the differences in heart attack symptoms in men and women

Thanks in part to decades of conditioning, a majority of the general public still believes that the ultimate telltale sign of a heart attack centers around one symptom: chest pain.

But now, new research from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre in Canada has found that in young and middle-aged women, chest pain might not be the first signal a heart attack is occurring.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: U of M researchers pinpoint efficient new method to produce cardiomyocytes

Each year, more people die worldwide from ischaemic heart disease than any other condition. This type of coronary artery disease is linked to a reduced blood supply to the heart.

Cardiac experts believe this type of heart disease happens because the cells that make up the heart muscle, cardiomyocytes, stop dividing and replenishing shortly after birth. A big push in research around this issue centers on creating cardiomyocytes to replace the cells failing within the heart, but because the body is no longer regenerating these naturally, they need to be developed by reprogramming other cells.

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research-and-clinical-trials

U of M researchers develop molecular “calcium sponge” to tackle heart failure

Researchers at the University of Minnesota’s Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology and the Lillehei Heart Institute have utilized molecular genetic engineering to optimize heart performance in models of diastolic heart failure by creating an optimized protein that can aid in high-speed relaxation similar to fast twitching muscles.

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