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I got my flu shot today and here’s why you should, too

Today I did something that could help safeguard my community from getting a potentially deadly infectious disease. Before you begin to think I did something heroic, I did something so simple it may surprise you (sans the title of this blog post): I got my flu shot.

Yes, it’s that simple folks. I got my flu shot. It took less than 30 seconds and the pain involved from the flu shot was far less than the pain involved in getting the actual flu.

I’ve heard many excuses or explanations as to why people choose not to get a flu shot, and many are rooted in myth, not fact. Health Talk even debunked many common flu shot myths in a blog post in 2013.

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in-the-news

Ebola, although deadly, not a likely threat to the US

The first documented Ebola outbreak was recorded over 40 years ago in central Africa. Until now, outbreaks have been contained rather quickly, and although medicine has advanced, the deadliest recorded outbreak of Ebola is happening in West Africa right now.

Having originated in fruit bats, the Ebola virus is found primarily in Africa. And while the origin of the virus may be thousands of miles away from Minnesota, visitors to the region including a Minnesota man set to visit family next month have perished after infection. Furthermore, the families of Liberians in Minnesota have taken action to protect their loved ones abroad by fundraising to battle the deadly virus.

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expert-perspectives

U of M expert: The evidence is in (again). Vaccines are safe

In 1998, Andrew Wakefield published fraudulent evidence blaming the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccination as the cause of autism in young children, prompting parents around the world to stop vaccinating their children. Despite the fact the paper was retracted, the damage was done and the anti-vaccine movement is still prevalent today.

CNN recently addressed the issue of vaccination refusal, and stated once again that children should be vaccinated. Period.

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news-and-notes

Health Talk Recommends: U.S. causes of death then & now

Of the many spectacular inventions of the 1900s, it’s safe to say we never may have made it to where we are today without radar, plastics or the once-revolutionary vacuum tube triode (responsible, in case you’re wondering, for launching the age of electronics).

Medical advances made throughout the 20th century, too, are nothing to bat an eye at.

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beyond-minnesota

Is the biggest threat to wild cats … dogs? The research is in.

Big cat populations including the Amur tiger and Amur leopard are in jeopardy of extinction. Fewer than 550 Amur tigers and leopards remain in the wilderness of China and the Russian Far East today. Alongside threats posed by changing climates and human pressures, is another threat to cats that may sound familiar: dogs.

That’s right. A virus carried by the domestic dog may be one of the biggest threats to endangered wild felids like the Amur tiger.

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beyond-minnesota

Health Talk Recommends: Why Pakistan’s polio problem is of global concern

For most Americans, polio is a concern relegated to the past. The crippling disease once plagued so many, including President Franklin D. Roosevelt, but in the decades since vaccines were developed in the 1950’s, the condition has been eradicated in the United States. The disease is still active in a handful of places, however, including Afghanistan, Pakistan, and parts of Nigeria.

Now, according to reports by Reuters, polio cases are on the rise in Pakistan and appear to be linked to a strong anti-vaccination policy by the Taliban, which maintains a presence along the country’s northern border.

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