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research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: Indoor tanning, a driver in melanoma trends among young women and men

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to ban indoor tanning for minors as physicians have seen an increase in melanoma cases among young adults in recent decades.

In a study released today in a Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA Dermatology), researchers from the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health examined age- and sex-specific associations between indoor tanning and melanoma to determine whether the tanning trend is driving the increase in cases, especially among younger women.

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in-the-news

In the news: Study shows processed meats may increase cancer risk

It might be time to rethink the typical American backyard barbecue with hot dogs and bacon cheeseburgers. Recent research from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) found more evidence that red meats and processed meats should be eaten in moderation. The study revealed consumption of hot dogs, ham and other processed meats is linked to colorectal cancer. The University of Minnesota collaborated on the study.

The IARC classifies processed meat as a carcinogen and the associated risk of developing colorectal cancer is small, but increases with consumption. Experts determined 50 grams or 1.75 ounces of meat per day (about two strips of bacon or six thin slices of ham) can increase the risk of colorectal cancer by 18 percent.

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expert-perspectives

Mammograms: Cutting through the mixed messages

The American Cancer Society (ACS) announced this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association that it revised long-standing breast cancer screening guidelines. But other medical groups, including the American College of Radiology and the Society for Breast Imaging, are not adopting the new guidelines. So, who’s right?

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: Researchers identify mechanisms that determine the aggressiveness of bone cancer

A new study published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry has found bone tumors have preprogrammed genes, meaning the genes of the cancer remain unchanged even after a tumor is found in the body.

Bone cancers are similar in canines and humans, so researchers are hoping to use this information to learn more about this type of cancer that predominantly affects dogs and children.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Snapshot: lower nicotine levels in cigarettes could mean lower dependence

Reducing the nicotine levels in cigarettes could lower cigarette use, according to new research published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The study was conducted by University of Pittsburgh researcher Eric Donny, Ph.D., and Dorothy Hatsukami, Ph.D., of the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, along with 8 other sites including the University of Minnesota-Duluth.

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in-the-news

Why Are Some Cancers More Deadly Than Others?

Minnesota Timberwolves coach Flip Saunders announced last week he has been diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. He is currently undergoing chemotherapy treatment for what his doctors call a “very treatable and curable form of cancer,” and will continue to coach as he goes through treatment.

So, why are some cancers more deadly than others?

 

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