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expert-perspectives

What does broccoli sprout tea have to do with cancer?

From a young age, kids are taught to eat their vegetables for the healthy benefits they pose. Now research is suggesting cruciferous vegetables like broccoli sprouts could offer more gains — cancer prevention.

Stephen Hecht, Ph.D., a University of Minnesota professor of laboratory medicine and pathology, and member of the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, conducts research focusing on tobacco-related cancer prevention. He recently was part of a different kind of groundbreaking research finding the right diet has the ability to decrease risks of developing certain types of cancer.

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education

50 years out: Will your genes define your Rx?

Tylenol should relieve pain, cough suppressants should ease cough and serious ailments should reliably respond to vital medication. But when a prescribed medicine doesn’t do its intended job, it can be difficult to decide who or what is to blame.

It doesn’t help that sometimes the problem doesn’t lie within the medicine or the doctor; it can lie within your genes.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Master regulator of key cancer gene found, offers new drug target

Gene partnership may be fueling cancer spread in as much as 20 percent of cancers

A key cancer-causing gene, responsible for up to 20 percent of cancers, may have a weak spot in its armor, according to new research from the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota.

The partnership of MYC, a gene long linked to cancer, and a non-coding RNA, PVT1, could be the key to understanding how MYC fuels cancer cells. The research is published in the latest issue of the journal Nature.

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research-and-clinical-trials

U of M research finds kava plant may prevent cigarette smoke-induced lung cancer

New research from the University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy and Masonic Cancer Center has found that consumption of the root of Piper methysticum, or kava, a plant native to the South Pacific Islands, may prevent the development of tobacco smoke-induced lung cancer.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: Seeking complete remission prior to allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation in patients battling AML

Allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation (allo-HCT) is one of the most advanced cell-based therapies available in the fight against complex conditions that can damage or disrupt bone marrow or immune system function.

The procedure, which involves a transplant of blood-forming stem cells from a donor with genetic similarities, provides patients a chance for remission in the fight against conditions like multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and several types of acute and chronic leukemias, to name a few.

The procedure also remains one of the most effective treatments for most patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

But what conditions should physicians see in their patients before employing allo-HCT?

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research-and-clinical-trials

U of M researchers identify key proteins influencing major immune strategy

New research from the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, and the University of Minnesota Center for Immunology has identified key proteins that influence immune response strategies, a finding that could influence new vaccination approaches.

The study, published in the latest edition of Nature Immunology, looked closely at the KLF2 and S1P1 genes, and how their expression impacted the immune strategy of a cell.

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