Academic Health Center
Stay Connected
expert-perspectives

Expert perspective: Using aspirin regularly may lower cancer risk

Long-term aspirin use may reduce risk for overall cancer, according to a new study in JAMA Oncology.

Researchers set out to take a closer look at aspirin use for cancer prevention and better understand the benefits of aspirin for cancer screening. They found an association between aspirin use and lower cancer risk – primarily because the benefits as it related to incidence of gastrointestinal cancer were particularly notable.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: UMN researchers develop unique method to analyze oxidative DNA damage in age-related macular degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among older adults in the developed world. To better understand the mechanisms of AMD to hopefully one day prevent and treat it, researchers in the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health and the Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Neurosciences have developed a unique method for analyzing oxidative damage in tiny amounts of DNA from the human eye. Results of the study were recently published in Scientific Reports.

Led by Irina Stepanov, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School of Public Health and Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, the team used a highly sensitive method that can detect specific oxidative modifications in DNA. They used this method to analyze mitochondrial DNA from retinal pigment epithelium, a single cell layer from eye tissues, and compared results between samples that came from healthy eyes and those with age-related macular degeneration.

Read more
expert-perspectives

The Cancer Moonshot: Dr. Christopher Pennell on cancer research and treatment

When President Obama delivered his final State of the Union address last month, he challenged Americans to channel the innovation and spirit that lead to putting a man on the moon to achieve the next great “moonshot”: finding a cure to cancer. In honor of the cancer moonshot, Health Talk will be drawing upon the vast knowledge of the researchers in the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota in an ongoing series dedicated to cancer research. To kick things off, we sat down with Christopher Pennell, Ph.D., Associate Professor in the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, to gain insight into the work he does at the Masonic Cancer Center and where cancer research is headed.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: Indoor tanning, a driver in melanoma trends among young women and men

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to ban indoor tanning for minors as physicians have seen an increase in melanoma cases among young adults in recent decades.

In a study released today in a Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA Dermatology), researchers from the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health examined age- and sex-specific associations between indoor tanning and melanoma to determine whether the tanning trend is driving the increase in cases, especially among younger women.

Read more
in-the-news

In the news: Study shows processed meats may increase cancer risk

It might be time to rethink the typical American backyard barbecue with hot dogs and bacon cheeseburgers. Recent research from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) found more evidence that red meats and processed meats should be eaten in moderation. The study revealed consumption of hot dogs, ham and other processed meats is linked to colorectal cancer. The University of Minnesota collaborated on the study.

The IARC classifies processed meat as a carcinogen and the associated risk of developing colorectal cancer is small, but increases with consumption. Experts determined 50 grams or 1.75 ounces of meat per day (about two strips of bacon or six thin slices of ham) can increase the risk of colorectal cancer by 18 percent.

Read more
expert-perspectives

Mammograms: Cutting through the mixed messages

The American Cancer Society (ACS) announced this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association that it revised long-standing breast cancer screening guidelines. But other medical groups, including the American College of Radiology and the Society for Breast Imaging, are not adopting the new guidelines. So, who’s right?

Read more