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research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: E-cigarettes may result in lower consumed toxicants for users, says new UMN research

E-cigarettes are a quickly growing market, and potentially for good reason. New research out of the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota shows the metabolized levels of disease-causing compounds are significantly lower in e-cigarettes than traditional cigarettes.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Grant Announcement: University of Minnesota receives multimillion-dollar NIH grant to research new heart attack treatments

A University of Minnesota multidisciplinary research team was awarded $2.6 million by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to investigate new treatments for heart attacks. The research will focus on myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury, which account for over 300,000 deaths each year in the U.S.

Myocardial ischemia occurs when blood flow to the heart muscle is stopped by blocked coronary arteries. The cessation causes the death of heart muscle cells, called necrotic cell death. Instances of a severely blocked coronary artery can result in a heart attack.

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news-and-notes

Top Five Medical Research Highlights for 2014

In 2014, the University of Minnesota Medical School published several groundbreaking medical discoveries. From unlocking questions about heart cells to a UMN health researcher getting rock star treatment in front of more than 20,000 screaming fans, here are a few highlights .

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expert-perspectives

Players pass more than the puck as mumps spreads through the NHL

A fever is spreading through hockey nation, but this one isn’t about fan frenzy. It’s mumps, and at least a dozen National Hockey League (NHL) players have been diagnosed.

According to the Associated Press, mumps has spread through the locker rooms of the Anaheim Ducks, New Jersey Devils, New York Rangers, and Minnesota Wild – where five players are reportedly ill. It isn’t clear if the teams passed the disease along with the puck during matchups or caught it in other ways.

Mumps is a disease most common among children. It is highly contagious and symptoms include fever, headache, body aches, and swelling in the salivary glands. In some cases, it can have serious effects, including encephalitis, hearing loss, or even sterility in young men.

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news-and-notes

UMN mourns loss of Lee Wattenberg, M.D., recognized as the “father of chemoprevention”

The faculty and staff of the University of Minnesota and the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota are mourning the loss of cancer pioneer Lee Wattenberg, M.D. Wattenberg died December 9 at the age of 92, and will be remembered for his immense contribution to the field of chemoprevention.

Wattenberg is credited with the creation of an entire field of research in the wake of his landmark 1966 paper in Cancer Research examining the effects of certain compounds on cancer development.  This led to a new emphasis on understanding cancer prevention, including the use of foods such as cabbage and broccoli to try to prevent cancer.

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in-the-news

Health Talk Recommends: What’s so bad about gluten?

If you’ve visited a grocery store or restaurant lately you’ve undoubtedly seen an increase in the amount of gluten-free food options available to you. The gluten-free food industry is exploding now, too, and according to a recent article in The New Yorker, by 2016 the gluten-free product industry will exceed $15 billion.

The article explains that gluten is one of the most commonly and heavily consumed proteins on earth, and has been for thousands of years. Gluten is created when two molecules, glutenin and gliadin, come into contact and form a bond. For the one percent of the American population with celiac disease, even the slightest exposure to gluten can trigger a violent immune system reaction that can damage the small intestine.

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