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in-the-news

In the News: U of M offers new cancer treatment for neuroblastoma

Neuroblastoma, a type of childhood cancer, is difficult to treat. And according to the American Cancer Institute, about 700 people in the United States are diagnosed with this form of cancer each year.

Raymond Yeager has dealt with the neuroblastoma since he was 14 years old. Now 20, he’s undergone many treatments including chemotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery, a stem cell transplant and immunotherapy. Unfortunately, nothing has helped…

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expert-perspectives

Make the most out of Daylight Saving Time

This weekend, we spring ahead and lose an hour of sleep as part of Daylight Saving Time. For many people, this may create some problems only because they forgot to set their clock ahead before going to bed.

For those who tend to be night owls, shift workers, or who have sleep disorders, it can be more problematic. The additional loss of precious sleep can be a more substantial problem. When we are sleepy, we often don’t perform as well at work and are more likely to make mistakes and have car accidents.

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in-the-news

In the News: U of M doctor offers expertise on rare condition

Teenagers Jonathon and Christopher Naquin of Humble, Texas have never been able to pinpoint the cause of their mysterious symptoms.

Since childhood, Jonathon, 18, and Christopher, 16, experienced significant levels of protein and blood in their urine and even suffered hearing loss while in elementary school.

But now, after years of tests and baffling doctors, the two boys and their family finally received the answer they were looking for: Alport Syndrome. Never heard of it? You’re not alone…

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patient-care

What is an ACL injury and how is it treated?

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news-and-notes

A new chapter begins

Today marks my first official day as vice president of health sciences and dean of the Medical School here at the University of Minnesota.  After months of anticipation, I am excited to get started working with all of you on the important mission of this great institution.

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expert-perspectives

Sedentary lifestyle, not shoveling itself, contributes to health hazards

This probably isn’t news to you but shoveling that wet, heavy snow can be a real pain in the neck, err back. Unfortunately, some people have experienced that shoveling snow has led to aches, pains and in some severe instances heart attacks.

And while true in certain cases, the problem isn’t solely dependent upon the snow shoveling activity itself but rather the sedentary lifestyle that some of these people live.

Shoveling is a lot of work and you do use a lot of muscles in your legs, arms and back which places extra strain on your heart.

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