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in-the-news

In The News: Innovative U of M clinical trial offers hope for rare skin disease

Children with epidermolysis bullosa (EB) face large life challenges from the get-go. The genetic disorder leaves skin extremely fragile and with visible rashes and painful blisters. According to an NBC News report, approximately 25,000 to 50,000 Americans, mostly children, live with EB and people who don’t receive treatment often die by the age of 30.

But a clinical trial led by Jakub Tolar, M.D., Ph.D., professor and pediatric blood and marrow transplant physician at the University of Minnesota Medical School, may help improve the quality of life for those diagnosed with EB.

“This is one of the most difficult to treat disorders and a very painful disorder,” Tolar said in the NBC News report. “Before we started, there was absolutely nothing that would change the outcome of these children.”

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in-the-news

In the News: Getting your baby to sleep through the night

One of the trickiest parts of parenthood, especially new parents, is getting your baby to sleep through the night. Not only is it important for your little one to get the sleep they need, it’s important for parents to get enough rest so you can continue to care for your new addition.

University of Minnesota neurologist, sleep expert, and father of three, Michael Howell, M.D., combined personal experience and years of research to develop a five step process to keep babies sleeping throughout the night.

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in-the-news

In The News: The burden of diabetes

By 2050, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that one in three people in the U.S. could have diabetes. Each year, the number of people with type one and type two diabetes increases.

Elizabeth Seaquist, M.D.Medical School, recently spoke with KSTP-TV about diabetes research and how the disease’s prevalence can be decreased.

Seaquist also wrote an article for The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) titled, Addressing the Burden of Diabetes.

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expert-perspectives

U of M expert: The evidence is in (again). Vaccines are safe

In 1998, Andrew Wakefield published fraudulent evidence blaming the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccination as the cause of autism in young children, prompting parents around the world to stop vaccinating their children. Despite the fact the paper was retracted, the damage was done and the anti-vaccine movement is still prevalent today.

CNN recently addressed the issue of vaccination refusal, and stated once again that children should be vaccinated. Period.

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news-and-notes

Chronic stress, depressive symptoms, and hostility associated with increased risk of stroke

A new study from the University of Minnesota links negative emotions with significantly increased risk of stroke or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs, or mini strokes) in middle-aged and older adults.

The results are published in the latest edition of the American Heart Association journal Stroke.

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expert-perspectives

U of M expert: Maximize your health through diet and exercise

Regular exercise is extremely important for people of all ages in order to stay healthy, whether it’s running a marathon or simply setting aside time to power walk a few times per week. But knowing when to eat, what to eat and what exercises are safe at a given age can have a major impact on how someone gains muscle or loses excess fat.

In order to fully understand some variables that impact the effectiveness of a diet and exercise routine, Health Talk consulted David Jewison, M.D. in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery.

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