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‘Overdose antidote’ naloxone marks one year of availability in Minnesota

It has now been one full year since naloxone, commonly known as Narcan, has been available at pharmacies here in Minnesota. The increased availability of the life-saving drug has made a difference according to medical professionals at the University of Minnesota.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Review: Alpha blockers helpful in treating kidney stones

A new review published this week in The BMJ suggests that alpha blockers are also a beneficial treatment for patients who find themselves in the emergency room with a kidney stone that has dropped into their ureter, a thin tube that transports urine from the kidney to bladder. This medication appears to work particularly if the kidney stone is large.

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in-the-news

In the News: University of Minnesota research drives home aspirin’s benefits

Despite its known benefits, new research from the University of Minnesota’s Medical School shows many older patients don’t talk to their doctors about the cardiovascular benefits of low-dose aspirin.

The study, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, looked at aspirin use of 26,000 Minnesotans ages 25 to 74. The study found aspirin use for primary prevention of heart attacks and stroke increased in men from 1 percent in 1980 to 21 percent in 2009, and in women from 1 percent to 12 percent.

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in-the-news

In the News: Drug manufacturers fail to report serious side effects within 15-day time period

Drug manufacturers are required to disclose serious side effects and unexpected adverse events to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) within 15 days of being notified by a patient. However, a recent study at the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health in collaboration with Stanford Graduate School of Business and the Carlson School of Management, found 1 in 10 companies fail to comply with these regulations.

The research, referenced in a recent Star Tribune article, analyzed 1.6 million reports from drug manufacturers between 2004 and 2014. Results showed the companies were less likely to disclose the reports to the FDA if the side effects were fatal.

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in-the-news

In the News: U of M research confirms benefits of early HIV treatment

In a study conducted by the U of M, research found those with HIV should be put on antiretroviral drugs as soon as they learn they are infected, as announced by NIH officials.

The findings came in combination with a statement ending the study because the benefits of starting treatment right away were so definitive.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: Inhaler ban increases costs for asthma patients

Over 25 million people in the U.S. rely on respiratory inhalers to relieve wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing and additional asthma-related symptoms. In an attempt to reduce their environmental footprint, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) placed a ban on the production of ozone-depleting inhalers.

This 2008 ban changed the type of albuterol inhalers available to asthma patients, and eliminated the use of inhalers with chlorofluorocarbon (CFC). These generic medications were replaced by the more expensive alternative that uses hydrofluoroalkane (HFA), a more environmentally friendly inhaler.

A recent JAMA Internal Medicine study found that this inhaler ban has been more costly, as the average asthma patient is paying twice as much for their medication. Health Talk turned to co-author of the study, Pinar Karaca-Mandic, Ph.D., from the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota to help explain the ban and its costly impacts on asthma patients.

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