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expert-perspectives

UMN expert: Cancer screenings are best tool we have to lower cancer deaths

According to the American Cancer Society, more than one million people in the United States get cancer each year. Furthermore, two in three people diagnosed with cancer survive at least five years, due in large part to early detection through cancer screening.

Cancer screenings are the best tool we have right now to lower the rates of death from cancer says Timothy Church, Ph.D., professor of environmental health sciences in the School of Public Health and a member of the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota. Church is also currently a member of the American Cancer Society’s Guideline Development Group.

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research-and-clinical-trials

U of M research: Implications of expanding indications for drug treatment to prevent fracture in older men

A new University of Minnesota-led study of osteoporosis in men recently published in the British Medical Journal found the proportion of older men labeled as abnormal and warranting drug treatment ranged from 2 percent to 25 percent depending on the definition of osteoporosis and absolute fracture risk intervention thresholds applied to the population.

Older men experience 29 percent of all bone fractures among United States adults 50 years of age or older. However, the best strategy to identify men who are candidates for drug treatment is not yet known. The uncertainty exists, in part, because osteoporosis is not as well defined for men as it is for women. In addition, drug treatment in women with osteoporosis reduces risk of bone fractures, but the effect of treatment on fracture risk has not been evaluated in men.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Advanced imaging technology aiding in prostate cancer screenings

According to the American Cancer Society, prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men after skin cancer. Despite the grim reality of a positive cancer diagnosis, prostate cancer can often be treated effectively if discovered early.

At the Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) at the University of Minnesota, researchers are utilizing robust magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology to better diagnose and follow patients with prostate cancer.

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expert-perspectives

Men’s health: Diet and quality food key to lifelong health and wellness

Promising a slimmer waist or quick weight loss results, new diet fads or trends often offer the easy way out rather than focusing on lifelong health and wellness. Earlier this year Health Talk featured the top diet trends for 2014 with some words of advice from School of Public Health professor David Jacobs, Ph.D.

Jacobs advised to maintain a diet with minimally processed foods along with a more plant-centered diet along with smaller portion sizes.

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beyond-minnesota

“Movember” provides chance to grow the ‘stache you’ve always dreamed of

Attention males! Have you been waiting for the perfect opportunity to join the ranks of moustache greatness? Look no further, Movember is here!

Movember is a time when men are encouraged to grow out their facial hair for a whole month to raise awareness around men’s health issues such as cancer and mental health issues.

In 2012, U.S. Movember registered more than 1.1 million people and raised an impressive $21 million. The majority of the money goes to national programs including Livestrong Foundation, Prostate Cancer Foundation and the Movember Foundation, which emphasizes men’s health awareness and education…

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research-and-clinical-trials

U of M, UAB to host innovative new center dedicated to African American men’s health care and research

A $13.5 million grant will create new center at the University of Minnesota, designed to address health disparities in conditions impacting African American men. The center is a joint academic venture between the University of Minnesota and the University of Alabama, Birmingham.

The grant was awarded by the National Institutes for Health’s National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities and will fund the center over 5 years. Selwyn Vickers, M.D., F.A.C.S., chairman of the Department of Surgery, and Badrinath Konety, M.D., M.B.A., chairman of the Department of Urology, will lead the project at the University of Minnesota.

“This award and the development of this center underscore the exceptional academic-community partnerships the University of Minnesota has developed,” said Vickers, the principle investigator on the project. “Along with our strong track record for solid infrastructure and a strong partnership with the University of Alabama-Birmingham, this made Minnesota an exceptional choice for this type of research.”

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