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news-and-notes

New ACA money goes to reaching new patients, expanded student training

Recently, the U of M’s Community-University Health Care Center began receiving three new federal grants to fund additional clinic services. Totaling $744,000 over two years, the grants from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services will allow the Community-University Health Care Center at the University of Minnesota to begin providing combined substance abuse and mental health screenings for approximately 80 percent of patients over age 12 …

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beyond-minnesota

First World Suicide Report released on World Suicide Prevention Day at University of Minnesota

For the first time, the World Health Organization (WHO) has created the World Suicide Report in collaboration with nations around the world. It is being released today in the USA in recognition of World Suicide Prevention Day by SAVE, IASP and the University of Minnesota.

According to the World Health Organization, more than 800,000 people die by suicide each year, one person every 40 seconds, and suicide is the second leading cause of death for people 15-29 years old.

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news-and-notes

U of M psychiatry experts, Minnesota legislators align to advance first episode psychosis programs

Last weekend, Minnesota senator Amy Klobuchar visited the University of Minnesota Psychiatry Clinic to host a roundtable discussion around first episode psychosis and to discuss options for improving the care and long-term prognosis for patients suffering psychiatric illness.

Recent federal legislation allocated more behavioral health funding to establish new first episode programs at the state level or bolster existing programs like the one found at the University of Minnesota.

According to Charles Schulz, M.D., chair of the University of Minnesota Medical School’s Department of Psychiatry, Senator Klobuchar has an active interest in mental health but shares the concerns of University providers around the average time it takes patients to receive treatment from the onset of their disease, a statistic that continues to hover around a year and a half.

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outreach

UMN, community groups partner to address mental illness in the homeless

In 2005, the University of Minnesota Medical School’s Department of Psychiatry partnered with People Incorporated Mental Health Services and other service providers to address this issue. Together, they created two Safe Haven shelters to help those who are homeless and suffering with mental illness on the streets of Minneapolis and St. Paul.

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beyond-minnesota

“Movember” provides chance to grow the ‘stache you’ve always dreamed of

Attention males! Have you been waiting for the perfect opportunity to join the ranks of moustache greatness? Look no further, Movember is here!

Movember is a time when men are encouraged to grow out their facial hair for a whole month to raise awareness around men’s health issues such as cancer and mental health issues.

In 2012, U.S. Movember registered more than 1.1 million people and raised an impressive $21 million. The majority of the money goes to national programs including Livestrong Foundation, Prostate Cancer Foundation and the Movember Foundation, which emphasizes men’s health awareness and education…

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research-and-clinical-trials

U of M study shows people with mental health problems are more likely to be uninsured or to rely on public insurance

A new University of Minnesota study shows that people with mental health problems are more likely to be uninsured and rely on public insurance than people without mental health problems. The cost of mental health services continues to be a concern, especially for persons with serious mental health problems who are uninsured. Public insurance coverage, such as Medicaid or Medicare, generally provides people with mental health issues the most affordable means to access needed treatment.

With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), many more people with mental health problems will have access to health insurance – particularly in states, liked Minnesota, that have opted to expand their Medicaid programs – and people with mental health problems on public insurance have better access to care and lower cost barriers than the uninsured or those with private health insurance coverage.

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