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expert-perspectives

New study suggests prenatal vitamins are not worth the money

For years, pregnant women have been advised to take prenatal vitamins in order to ensure proper growth and nutrition of the fetus.

However, a recent report by the Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin says that prenatal vitamins are an unnecessary expense and are not as effective as doctors have made them seem.  

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expert-perspectives

Expert perspective: New sleep guidelines for children announced

Sleep is critical to the overall growth and development of infants, children and teens. But how much sleep is enough? The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Sleep Medicine recently released a set of guidelines that outlines how much sleep children should be receiving at different ages.

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in-the-news

In the news: UMN group leads effort to develop new pediatric medical devices

Transforming a concept on paper to a tangible and functioning medical device requires a lot of time and research. And even more money.

It could take an estimated profit margin of $500 million or more before a tech company will move to invest in a new medical device, the Star Tribune estimates. Finding funding to reach that point is difficult to say the least. That’s why Gwen Fischer, M.D., assistant professor in the department of pediatrics of the University of Minnesota Medical School, teamed up with medical device colleagues to form the Pediatric Device Innovation Consortium (PDIC).

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: Filtered sunlight a safe, effective jaundice treatment in developing countries

New research could provide a safe, low-tech method for treating newborn jaundice. The project offers an effective and inexpensive solution for developing countries, where more than 150,000 babies each year suffer brain damage or death due to this serious health condition.

The study, published in the latest issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, was led by Tina Slusher, M.D., associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Minnesota. Two other UMN researchers, Ann Brearley, Ph.D., and Troy Lund, M.D., Ph.D., helped with the study. In addition, researchers at the Stanford School of Medicine, University of California-San Diego, and Island Maternity Hospital, Massey Street Children’s Hospital and Hearing International Nigeria in Lagos all contributed to the project.

“There are so many areas in the world where jaundice is a big concern, but access to consistent electricity or advanced medical treatments aren’t always possible,” said Slusher. “The method we’ve outlined harnesses a natural resource in sunlight, but safely, giving parents and care providers an incredibly accessible, useful tool to treat this dangerous and common illness.”

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research-and-clinical-trials

UMN doctor awarded collaborative grant to study newborn hearing screening and CMV screening in Minnesota

A new grant will enable the collaboration between the Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota and the University of Minnesota Medical Center. The research will allow further evaluation of newborn infants failing hearing screenings for cytomegalovirus (CMV).

Typically asymptomatic, CMV is the most common congenital infection among children and is responsible for 30 percent of childhood hearing loss cases.

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expert-perspectives

Are ”safer” playgrounds better?

Parents and experts are always looking for ways to keep kids safe, but many agree the movement may have gone too far when it comes to playgrounds.

According to the New York Times, critics of new safer playgrounds say they may stunt emotional development, leaving children with anxieties and fears.

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