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research-and-clinical-trials

Advancing toward Cytomegalovirus vaccination

It’s among the most common infectious diseases, difficult to detect and is the leading cause of deafness in children. This relatively unknown disease is called Cytomegalovirus (CMV). If a pregnant woman contracts this virus, her newborn will have high risk of conditions like cognitive delays and deafness. But new research from UMN is helping experts move closer to developing a vaccination.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Tunneling Nanotubes: Cellular Highways for Cancer Drug Delivery, Study Suggests

The exceedingly narrow, long offshoots stemming from cancer cells called tunneling nanotubes exchange important cellular cargo vital to sustaining the cells. But new evidence published in Molecular Therapy – Oncolytics shows these tubes may be ideal for distributing cancer-killing viruses, offering a new avenue for cancer treatment.

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research-and-clinical-trials

The formula for a beautiful smile

What’s in a beautiful smile?

According to science, and history, symmetry might be the answer.

“From ancient Greece and Italy of Renaissance, symmetry and parallelism were considered significant for the perception of attractiveness,” said Vasiliki Koidou, D.D.S., dental fellow in the School of Dentistry’s Department of Surgical Sciences.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Review: Alpha blockers helpful in treating kidney stones

A new review published this week in The BMJ suggests that alpha blockers are also a beneficial treatment for patients who find themselves in the emergency room with a kidney stone that has dropped into their ureter, a thin tube that transports urine from the kidney to bladder. This medication appears to work particularly if the kidney stone is large.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Could interactions between brain regions cause Schizophrenia?

Scientists don’t know exactly what causes schizophrenia, but a new project led by University of Minnesota Medical School researcher Scott Sponheim, Ph.D., will study the interaction between the visual cortex and the prefrontal cortex, hoping to uncover why visual hallucinations occur, what causes the disease and how to better treat the disease.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Scientists find new way to improve MERS vaccines

Since the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) was discovered in 2012, more than 1,800 people have been infected with the disease and the fatality rate is a concerning 36 percent. There’s still no approved MERS vaccine for humans. However, promising new research reported in Nature Communications this week may help pave the way for a human vaccine – and give hope for a new era of protection against similar viral infections.

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