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research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: Antibiotics and Bacterial Resistance in Food Animals

Out of concern over the growing number of antibiotic resistant bacteria, federal policymakers will phase out the practice of giving food animals low-doses of antibiotics to promote growth. In an effort to discover whether science backs up the potential policy change, Associate Professor in Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences at the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) Tim Johnson, Ph.D., studied the issue.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: Inhaler ban increases costs for asthma patients

Over 25 million people in the U.S. rely on respiratory inhalers to relieve wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing and additional asthma-related symptoms. In an attempt to reduce their environmental footprint, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) placed a ban on the production of ozone-depleting inhalers.

This 2008 ban changed the type of albuterol inhalers available to asthma patients, and eliminated the use of inhalers with chlorofluorocarbon (CFC). These generic medications were replaced by the more expensive alternative that uses hydrofluoroalkane (HFA), a more environmentally friendly inhaler.

A recent JAMA Internal Medicine study found that this inhaler ban has been more costly, as the average asthma patient is paying twice as much for their medication. Health Talk turned to co-author of the study, Pinar Karaca-Mandic, Ph.D., from the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota to help explain the ban and its costly impacts on asthma patients.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: Can laryngeal cancer survival differences be explained by pre-existing conditions or treatment types?

In a new study conducted by the University of Minnesota, researchers found that patients with early laryngeal cancer have greater survival outcomes if their treatment includes surgery, even when they adjusted for other medical problems and sociodemographics.

The research conducted by University of Minnesota otolaryngologist, Stephanie Misono, M.D., M.P.H. and health policy expert, Schelomo Marmor, Ph.D., in conjunction with Bevan Yueh, MD MPH in otolaryngology and senior author Beth A. Virnig PhD, was a follow up study to their prior work, in which they saw a difference in survival outcomes between patients treated with surgery vs patients treated with radiation for their early laryngeal cancer, leading them to investigate if other medical conditions or sociodemographic factors influenced those results.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: Large number of people are eligible for special enrollment periods, majority are uninsured

A study released online today in Health Affairs found there is a large number of people who are potentially eligible for special enrollment periods as part of federal and state Marketplace health insurance exchanges, and the majority are uninsured.

The study was led by Lacey Hartman, a senior research fellow at the State Health Access Data Assistance Center (SHADAC) in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota.

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in-the-news

In the news: No link between MMR vaccine and autism, even for children at risk for autism

In a new study published in JAMA, researchers yet again found no link between the MMR vaccine and autism, even for kids who are at risk for developing autism.

According to Forbes, “the likelihood of developing autism was actually lower for those at-risk children if they received the vaccine, though that finding was not statistically significant and no one would suggest that vaccination reduces autism risk. What vaccination reduces is disease, the kinds that can disable and kill children and the kind that is even more likely to cause serious complications in children with neurological conditions.”

The study’s findings were not surprising to infectious disease experts, including Mark Schleiss, M.D., a pediatric infectious disease physician at the University of Minnesota.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: Minimum distance requirements for critical access hospitals may harm the rural health care system

A new study from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health finds more than 250 hospitals nationally could lose critical access status because of a minimum distance requirement, which requires the hospital to be located at least 15 road miles from the next nearest hospital. These critical access hospitals had higher patient volume, were more financially stable, were more likely to publicly report quality data, and had better quality performance than critical access hospitals located farther from other hospitals.

The study findings, published today in the April issue of Health Affairs, also found loss of critical access hospital status and cost-based reimbursement from Medicare would have considerable negative impacts on these hospitals and the rural communities that depend on them for health care.

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