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Research snapshot: Study finds high likelihood of over-service at alcohol establishments

Excessive alcohol consumption in bars and restaurants has been directly linked to drinking and driving and incidents of violence. Despite laws prohibiting over-service, alcohol establishments are continuing to serve obviously intoxicated customers, according to a recent study from the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota.

“Measuring the likelihood that bars and restaurants will sell alcohol to intoxicated patrons is an important step in understanding the scope of this public health issue,” said Kathleen Lenk, M.P.H., research fellow and co-author of the study. “Preventing and reducing sales to intoxicated customers may lead to decreased alcohol-impaired driving, fatal traffic crashes, alcohol-related violence and other harms.”

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research-and-clinical-trials

SPH study shows importance of caregiver’s role in fostering academic success among African American youth

New research from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health finds academic success of African American youth is associated with their access to resources for resilience. African American children who perceive high support from their caregivers and utilize more adaptive coping strategies may perform better academically.

The study, led by School of Public Health graduate and predoctoral student, Ashley Chesmore, M.P.H., recruited 46 African American children aged 8-12 years. Data was collected by  Principal Investigator and associate professor, Sonya Brady, Ph.D., on the children’s resources for resilience such as coping skills and perceived support of caregivers. This data was combined with the children’s progress reports and recent standardized tests.

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beyond-minnesota

Uganda Hub fosters global health research collaborations, education and engagement with African partners

Tackling the devastating effects of global health phenomenon is central to the work of health scientists and educators around the globe. No place is their work more critical than in Africa where the onslaught of deadly epidemics like HIV/AIDS and Ebola, coupled with worsening environmental crises such as climate change and food scarcity, have affected generations of people and challenged leading scientists for decades.

That’s why the University of Minnesota and Makerere University in Uganda partnered to establish the Uganda Hub of Innovation.

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expert-perspectives

The Cancer Moonshot: Dr. Christopher Pennell on cancer research and treatment

When President Obama delivered his final State of the Union address last month, he challenged Americans to channel the innovation and spirit that lead to putting a man on the moon to achieve the next great “moonshot”: finding a cure to cancer. In honor of the cancer moonshot, Health Talk will be drawing upon the vast knowledge of the researchers in the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota in an ongoing series dedicated to cancer research. To kick things off, we sat down with Christopher Pennell, Ph.D., Associate Professor in the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, to gain insight into the work he does at the Masonic Cancer Center and where cancer research is headed.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: Why are obstetric units in rural hospitals closing their doors?

New research from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health shows obstetric units in rural hospitals are closing their doors, due to difficulty in staffing, low birth volume, and financial burdens. As the annual birth volume decreases, additional rural hospitals will be vulnerable to obstetric unit closure in the future.

The study findings were published in the Health Services Research. Doctoral student and lead author, Peiyin Hung M.S.P.H., and her colleagues gathered hospital discharge data as well as conducted interviews to identify factors associated with unit closures between 2010 and 2014. The analysis found 7.2 percent of rural hospitals in the study closed their obstetric units. These units were typically small in size and located in communities with fewer resources including lower family income, fewer obstetricians and fewer family physicians.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: Indoor tanning, a driver in melanoma trends among young women and men

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to ban indoor tanning for minors as physicians have seen an increase in melanoma cases among young adults in recent decades.

In a study released today in a Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA Dermatology), researchers from the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health examined age- and sex-specific associations between indoor tanning and melanoma to determine whether the tanning trend is driving the increase in cases, especially among younger women.

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