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research-and-clinical-trials

Review: Alpha blockers helpful in treating kidney stones

A new review published this week in The BMJ suggests that alpha blockers are also a beneficial treatment for patients who find themselves in the emergency room with a kidney stone that has dropped into their ureter, a thin tube that transports urine from the kidney to bladder. This medication appears to work particularly if the kidney stone is large.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Could interactions between brain regions cause Schizophrenia?

Scientists don’t know exactly what causes schizophrenia, but a new project led by University of Minnesota Medical School researcher Scott Sponheim, Ph.D., will study the interaction between the visual cortex and the prefrontal cortex, hoping to uncover why visual hallucinations occur, what causes the disease and how to better treat the disease.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Scientists find new way to improve MERS vaccines

Since the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) was discovered in 2012, more than 1,800 people have been infected with the disease and the fatality rate is a concerning 36 percent. There’s still no approved MERS vaccine for humans. However, promising new research reported in Nature Communications this week may help pave the way for a human vaccine – and give hope for a new era of protection against similar viral infections.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Convenience stores in Twin Cities promote more unhealthy foods

New research from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health shows that making good nutritional choices at convenience stores is more difficult due to the prominent placement of advertisements and products that encourage people to purchase less healthy foods.

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Emerging methodology may improve mental health research

Mental health providers across the nation have seen a sharp rise in the number of people who participate in non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). The most recent estimates show 1 in 5 Americans have experimented with hurting themselves in times of emotional stress, with no lethal intent. Kathryn Cullen, MD, assistant professor in the department of psychiatry at the University of Minnesota Medical School, is now exploring the underlying cause of NSSI using a new approach to mental health research.

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Supervised exercise may become standard PAD treatment

Unlike current standards of care that use expensive drugs and invasive procedures, like angioplasty, stent placement or surgery, there is a new treatment for peripheral artery disease that is founded on a novel tenet: supervised exercise in a cardiac rehabilitation program. Research shows it may be the most effective, safe and cost-effective treatment for many patients – and it may soon be covered & approved by CMS.

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