Academic Health Center
Stay Connected
research-and-clinical-trials

University of Minnesota study: More effective alcohol policies ignored while less effective passed into law

What works to prevent alcohol-related deaths and binge drinking isn’t always what makes it into law. A new study finds that policymakers are significantly more likely to adopt ineffective alcohol policies than they are to adopt effective ones. Researchers at the University of Minnesota and Boston University tracked 29 different state alcohol control policies from 1999 through 2011 and found that that none of the policies rated to be the most effective for reducing excessive drinking were either adopted or strengthened during the study period. During that same period they noted an increase in adoption of policies that were comparatively less effective, or that targeted only youth drinking or impaired driving.

Read more
in-the-news

In the News: A new idea for treating Alzheimer’s

Ling Li is taking Alzheimer’s disease research in a new direction.

Recently, Scientific American took a minute to feature her preliminary research into a novel approach to Alzheimer’s drug development.

Read more
in-the-news

Mandated decrease in work hours may not be advantageous for neurosurgical residents

In an effort to decrease the amount of medical errors due to fatigue, in 2003 the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) imposed a mandatory maximum 80-hour work-week restriction on medical residents.

Before this mandate, residents often worked more than 100 hours per week and some neurosurgery residents in particular worked in excess of 120 hours per week. A University of Minnesota study recently  published in the Journal of Neurosurgery now finds the mandate could be leaving neurosurgery residents underprepared.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

Can this drug for Tylenol overdose make inroads with Type 1 diabetes?

A low-cost Tylenol overdose drug already available for cystic fibrosis use will soon enter clinical trials aimed at discovering whether it can aid in treating an additional condition: Type 1 diabetes.

The drug, a natural supplement, is thought to have potential use in the treatment of hypoglycemia, a condition in which too little blood sugar is present in the body.

Read more
in-the-news

In the News: U of M Study: PTSD symptoms linked to food addiction in women

New research suggests women with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms may be more likely to experience food addiction or dependence.

The study conducted by epidemiologist Susan Mason, M.P.H., Ph.D., an assistant professor at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health was recently published in JAMA Psychiatry.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: Modeling how the flu moves through pig farms

Humans aren’t the only ones who can contract the flu.

Influenza A viruses can also affect pigs and their piglets, which is why, just like in human populations, pig populations are commonly vaccinated against the flu.

Last week, University of Minnesota researchers published a new model addressing how swine producers approach vaccinating their pigs.

Read more