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research-and-clinical-trials

Study of colleges identifies gaps in efforts to enforce alcohol laws

A new study from the University of Minnesota reveals campus security law enforcement officials are not likely to issue citations to students for alcohol-law violations.

The study published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research asked directors of campus police and security from 343 colleges across the nation to complete a survey regarding their usual practices following serious, underage, and less-serious alcohol incidents on and off campus.

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research-and-clinical-trials

U of M study finds health insurance coverage and racial disparities exist in receiving reconstruction after mastectomy

A University of Minnesota School of Public Health study found health insurance coverage and racial disparities exist in women who have undergone reconstruction after mastectomy. In 2013, more than 232,000 women were diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States, and 37 percent of those women with breast cancer underwent a mastectomy, or the surgical removal of breast tissue. Of those, nearly one third undergo breast reconstruction to rebuild the shape of the removed breast. Breast reconstruction after mastectomy offers clinical, cosmetic and psychological benefits with low medical risk.

Study findings were recently published in Women’s Health Issues.

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research-and-clinical-trials

U of M research: Implications of expanding indications for drug treatment to prevent fracture in older men

A new University of Minnesota-led study of osteoporosis in men recently published in the British Medical Journal found the proportion of older men labeled as abnormal and warranting drug treatment ranged from 2 percent to 25 percent depending on the definition of osteoporosis and absolute fracture risk intervention thresholds applied to the population.

Older men experience 29 percent of all bone fractures among United States adults 50 years of age or older. However, the best strategy to identify men who are candidates for drug treatment is not yet known. The uncertainty exists, in part, because osteoporosis is not as well defined for men as it is for women. In addition, drug treatment in women with osteoporosis reduces risk of bone fractures, but the effect of treatment on fracture risk has not been evaluated in men.

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in-the-news

In The News: 1 in 10 deaths among adults attributed to excessive drinking

Summer’s outside activities don’t just come with heat and sun advisories, but warnings for alcohol safety, as well.  Annually, alcohol is responsible for an estimated 2.5 million deaths worldwide, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Among those deaths, 1.7 million people die from short-term causes such as car crashes or accidents. The risk of these incidents increases dramatically during holidays such as the Fourth of July.

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expert-perspectives

Men’s health: Diet and quality food key to lifelong health and wellness

Promising a slimmer waist or quick weight loss results, new diet fads or trends often offer the easy way out rather than focusing on lifelong health and wellness. Earlier this year Health Talk featured the top diet trends for 2014 with some words of advice from School of Public Health professor David Jacobs, Ph.D.

Jacobs advised to maintain a diet with minimally processed foods along with a more plant-centered diet along with smaller portion sizes.

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research-and-clinical-trials

U of M research: Early elective deliveries make up nearly 4 percent of U.S. births

While the past several years have seen a decline in the rate of elective labor inductions and cesarean deliveries between 37 and 39 weeks gestation, early elective births are still happening nation-wide. Labor induction or cesarean delivery without medical reason before a baby is considered full-term at 39 weeks, or an “early elective delivery,” is associated with health problems for mothers and babies.

New University of Minnesota research published in this month’s edition of the journal Medical Care is the first of its kind to show who is having early elective deliveries, and whether these deliveries happen following labor induction or cesarean.

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