Academic Health Center
Stay Connected
expert-perspectives

With summer break ahead, U of M expert shares what foods parents should keep in the fridge and pantry

Summer break is just around the corner and many parents are hoping to keep the fridge stocked with healthy and convenient options – especially for kids.

Health Talk spoke with Jamie Stang, Ph.D., M.P.H, director of the Leadership Education and Training Program in Maternal and Child Health Nutrition and associate professor in the School of Public Health, to learn how parents can still provide healthy food options this summer even if they’re not at home.

Read more
expert-perspectives

Expert Perspective: Debunking indoor tanning myths

If you’ve ever vacationed to a sunny beach spot, you’ve probably considered hitting the tanning salon to get a ‘base tan’ before leaving. In light of National Melanoma Skin Cancer Awareness Month, Health Talk spoke to DeAnn Lazovich, M.P.H., Ph.D., from the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota and the School of Public Health, who debunked four common tanning myths.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: Can laryngeal cancer survival differences be explained by pre-existing conditions or treatment types?

In a new study conducted by the University of Minnesota, researchers found that patients with early laryngeal cancer have greater survival outcomes if their treatment includes surgery, even when they adjusted for other medical problems and sociodemographics.

The research conducted by University of Minnesota otolaryngologist, Stephanie Misono, M.D., M.P.H. and health policy expert, Schelomo Marmor, Ph.D., in conjunction with Bevan Yueh, MD MPH in otolaryngology and senior author Beth A. Virnig PhD, was a follow up study to their prior work, in which they saw a difference in survival outcomes between patients treated with surgery vs patients treated with radiation for their early laryngeal cancer, leading them to investigate if other medical conditions or sociodemographic factors influenced those results.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: Large number of people are eligible for special enrollment periods, majority are uninsured

A study released online today in Health Affairs found there is a large number of people who are potentially eligible for special enrollment periods as part of federal and state Marketplace health insurance exchanges, and the majority are uninsured.

The study was led by Lacey Hartman, a senior research fellow at the State Health Access Data Assistance Center (SHADAC) in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

Research snapshot: Minimum distance requirements for critical access hospitals may harm the rural health care system

A new study from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health finds more than 250 hospitals nationally could lose critical access status because of a minimum distance requirement, which requires the hospital to be located at least 15 road miles from the next nearest hospital. These critical access hospitals had higher patient volume, were more financially stable, were more likely to publicly report quality data, and had better quality performance than critical access hospitals located farther from other hospitals.

The study findings, published today in the April issue of Health Affairs, also found loss of critical access hospital status and cost-based reimbursement from Medicare would have considerable negative impacts on these hospitals and the rural communities that depend on them for health care.

Read more
expert-perspectives

Expert perspective: Who delivers babies in rural hospitals?

Since late January, when the story broke about the upcoming closure of the maternity ward at the Grand Marais hospital, I’ve been thinking a lot about pregnant women, clinicians, and hospital administrators in Grand Marais, and in other rural communities in Minnesota and beyond.  For pregnant women in rural areas and for all individuals seeking care, both access and patient safety are necessary components of effective health care systems. They are not negotiable. In order to better understand how to ensure both access and safety, we need to start with relevant information for understanding both capacity and need for care in rural communities.

Approximately 20 percent of the U.S. population lives in a rural area, but only about 10 percent of the nation’s physicians are practicing in rural areas. Of the 2,050 rural U.S. counties, 77 percent are designated as health professional shortage areas.  A report from the Minnesota Department of Health highlights the workforce challenges and clinician shortages in Greater Minnesota.  And this is important, because rural Americans suffer worse health outcomes than those in urban areas, having higher rates of death, disability and chronic disease.

Read more