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in-the-news

Ebola, although deadly, not a likely threat to the US

The first documented Ebola outbreak was recorded over 40 years ago in central Africa. Until now, outbreaks have been contained rather quickly, and although medicine has advanced, the deadliest recorded outbreak of Ebola is happening in West Africa right now.

Having originated in fruit bats, the Ebola virus is found primarily in Africa. And while the origin of the virus may be thousands of miles away from Minnesota, visitors to the region including a Minnesota man set to visit family next month have perished after infection. Furthermore, the families of Liberians in Minnesota have taken action to protect their loved ones abroad by fundraising to battle the deadly virus.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Study of colleges identifies gaps in efforts to enforce alcohol laws

A new study from the University of Minnesota reveals campus security law enforcement officials are not likely to issue citations to students for alcohol-law violations.

The study published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research asked directors of campus police and security from 343 colleges across the nation to complete a survey regarding their usual practices following serious, underage, and less-serious alcohol incidents on and off campus.

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research-and-clinical-trials

U of M study finds health insurance coverage and racial disparities exist in receiving reconstruction after mastectomy

A University of Minnesota School of Public Health study found health insurance coverage and racial disparities exist in women who have undergone reconstruction after mastectomy. In 2013, more than 232,000 women were diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States, and 37 percent of those women with breast cancer underwent a mastectomy, or the surgical removal of breast tissue. Of those, nearly one third undergo breast reconstruction to rebuild the shape of the removed breast. Breast reconstruction after mastectomy offers clinical, cosmetic and psychological benefits with low medical risk.

Study findings were recently published in Women’s Health Issues.

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research-and-clinical-trials

U of M research: Implications of expanding indications for drug treatment to prevent fracture in older men

A new University of Minnesota-led study of osteoporosis in men recently published in the British Medical Journal found the proportion of older men labeled as abnormal and warranting drug treatment ranged from 2 percent to 25 percent depending on the definition of osteoporosis and absolute fracture risk intervention thresholds applied to the population.

Older men experience 29 percent of all bone fractures among United States adults 50 years of age or older. However, the best strategy to identify men who are candidates for drug treatment is not yet known. The uncertainty exists, in part, because osteoporosis is not as well defined for men as it is for women. In addition, drug treatment in women with osteoporosis reduces risk of bone fractures, but the effect of treatment on fracture risk has not been evaluated in men.

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news-and-notes

Chronic stress, depressive symptoms, and hostility associated with increased risk of stroke

A new study from the University of Minnesota links negative emotions with significantly increased risk of stroke or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs, or mini strokes) in middle-aged and older adults.

The results are published in the latest edition of the American Heart Association journal Stroke.

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in-the-news

In The News: 1 in 10 deaths among adults attributed to excessive drinking

Summer’s outside activities don’t just come with heat and sun advisories, but warnings for alcohol safety, as well.  Annually, alcohol is responsible for an estimated 2.5 million deaths worldwide, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Among those deaths, 1.7 million people die from short-term causes such as car crashes or accidents. The risk of these incidents increases dramatically during holidays such as the Fourth of July.

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