Academic Health Center
Stay Connected
expert-perspectives

Strong provider recommendation can make significant difference in HPV vaccination rates

At any point, 1 out of 4 people has at least one strain of Human papillomavirus (HPV), according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and National Institutes of Health (NIH), making HPV the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI).

The HPV vaccine is proven to prevent HPV infection, and in turn, prevent cancer.

Despite these glaring figures, vaccination rates remain low. According to the CDC, 6 in 10 girls are vaccinated for HPV, and only 4 in 10 boys.

Physician recommendations could make all the difference.

Read more
expert-perspectives

Childhood immunizations: What parents need to know

August is National Immunization Awareness Month and throughout the month Health Talk will focus on several key life stages and immunizations to keep you informed and help you cut through the clutter of misinformation available online about this critical public health issue.

Health Talk spoke with Mark Schleiss, M.D., professor of pediatrics in the University of Minnesota Medical School, and he provided some useful, reliable and scientifically proven information for parents regarding childhood immunizations.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

Meningitis B vaccine study raises questions about vaccine response in recent New Jersey university outbreak

A new study from the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health examined a college Meningitis B outbreak  in New Jersey, and found that about a third of students who had received the Meningitis B vaccine did not have a detectable immune response to the disease.

Read more
in-the-news

In the News: HPV vaccine has slow entry into public health policy

It’s been nearly a decade since the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination was introduced, yet vaccination rates are still very low. A recent JAMA report showed the HPV vaccine has had a more difficult time making its way into public health policy than other vaccinations.

According to recent data from the CDC, only 37.6 percent of American teenage girls have received the series of HPV vaccinations, and only 13.9 percent of teenage boys. Only two states, Virginia and, as of next month, Rhode Island, require the vaccination for middle school enrollment.

Read more
in-the-news

In the news: No link between MMR vaccine and autism, even for children at risk for autism

In a new study published in JAMA, researchers yet again found no link between the MMR vaccine and autism, even for kids who are at risk for developing autism.

According to Forbes, “the likelihood of developing autism was actually lower for those at-risk children if they received the vaccine, though that finding was not statistically significant and no one would suggest that vaccination reduces autism risk. What vaccination reduces is disease, the kinds that can disable and kill children and the kind that is even more likely to cause serious complications in children with neurological conditions.”

The study’s findings were not surprising to infectious disease experts, including Mark Schleiss, M.D., a pediatric infectious disease physician at the University of Minnesota.

Read more
research-and-clinical-trials

UMN finding helps scientists better understand DNA binding protein’s role in vaccination success

T-cells are essential to keeping our bodies safe from infection and disease. They roam the body looking for infection, and upon discovering it, work to clean it up. Anything that can improve how effective T-cells are, or how we understand them to work is a step toward advancing human health.

In the same vein, a recent finding led by University of Minnesota researchers in collaboration with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the University of California unveils a new understanding of T-cell operation.

Read more