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research-and-clinical-trials

New anti-HIV drug target identified by University of Minnesota researchers

University of Minnesota researchers have discovered a first-of-its-kind series of compounds possessing anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity. The compounds present a new target for potential HIV drug development and future treatment options.

Complete findings are printed in today’s issue of The Journal of Virology.

The compounds, known as ribonucleoside analogs 8-azaadenosine, formycin A, 3-deazauridine, 5-fluorocytidine and 2’-C-methylcytidine, were found to stop the replication and spread of HIV by blocking HIV DNA synthesis or by inducing lethal mutagenesis.

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research-and-clinical-trials

How to detect a virus

Today on Health Talk, we’re talking virus detection: how scientists come to suspect a new virus and the steps they take to develop a test to confirm their suspicions.

Developing the first test for a new virus is a laborious process, one with which University of Minnesota assistant scientists Sunny Sonnabend and Lindsey Raymond in the U of M’s Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory are intimately familiar. These two scientists are part of the U of M College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) team behind the nation’s first porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) rapid detection test, unveiled earlier this year.

Here’s what it takes to develop a test like no other:

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research-and-clinical-trials

U of M researchers land $5.7M grant to employ a new approach in the fight against HIV

Researchers from the University of Minnesota’s Program in HIV Medicine have been awarded a $5.7 million grant by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to test a new treatment approach in the fight against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

In clinical trials supported by the latest grant, University researchers will employ an FDA-approved drug with anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory properties to reverse the inflammatory damage caused by HIV replication in lymphatic tissues in an attempt to restore the population of immune cells (CD4 cells) that are essential for normal immune responses.

If successful, the trials could point to a new adjunctive therapy for HIV that could improve immune function and lead to a functional cure for the disease. The approach could also help protect HIV infected people from diseases associated with ongoing inflammation like heart attacks, blood clots and cancer.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Drug design success propels efforts to fight HIV with a combination of two FDA-approved drugs

A University of Minnesota research team featuring researchers from the Institute for Molecular VirologySchool of Dentistry and Center for Drug Design has developed a new delivery system for a combination of two FDA approved drugs that may serve as an effective treatment for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

The discovery, which allows for a combination of decitabine and gemcitabine to be delivered in pill form, marks a major step forward in patient feasibility for the drugs, which previously had been available solely via injection or intravenous therapy (IV).

The study, coauthored by Christine Clouser, Ph.D., Laurent Bonnac, Ph.D., Louis Mansky, Ph.D., and Steven Patterson, Ph.D., can be found “online first” in the journal Antiviral Chemistry & Chemotherapy.

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