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research-and-clinical-trials

Minnesota teen pregnancy at all time low, alternate concerns remain

The 2016 Minnesota Adolescent Sexual Health Report, recently released by the University of Minnesota’s Healthy Youth Development-Prevention Research Center, (HYD-PRC) shows Minnesota teen pregnancy rates have dropped significantly since 2014.

The report highlights current trends in pregnancy and birth rates as well as trends with sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The study also examined how how geographic location, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, and childhood experiences impacted those rates.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Biomarker may predict recurrence in endometrial cancer patients

Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic cancer in the U.S.

New research from the lab of Martina Bazzaro, Ph.D., of the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota and Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Women’s Health, suggests the deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) USP14 as a promising biomarker for identifying risk of recurrence in endometrial cancer patients.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: Why are obstetric units in rural hospitals closing their doors?

New research from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health shows obstetric units in rural hospitals are closing their doors, due to difficulty in staffing, low birth volume, and financial burdens. As the annual birth volume decreases, additional rural hospitals will be vulnerable to obstetric unit closure in the future.

The study findings were published in the Health Services Research. Doctoral student and lead author, Peiyin Hung M.S.P.H., and her colleagues gathered hospital discharge data as well as conducted interviews to identify factors associated with unit closures between 2010 and 2014. The analysis found 7.2 percent of rural hospitals in the study closed their obstetric units. These units were typically small in size and located in communities with fewer resources including lower family income, fewer obstetricians and fewer family physicians.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Maternal health and resources significant predictors of daughters’ self-rated health

You’ve heard the saying “a chip off the old block,” in regards to looks and personalities but researchers now want to know if that remains true when it comes to generational health outcomes. A new study from the University of Minnesota reveals a mother’s health significantly influences her daughter’s self-assessed health.

Lead researcher Tetyana Shippee, Ph.D., an assistant professor of health policy & management at University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health focuses on social gerontology and health disparities. Her research was motivated by her desire to examine the intergenerational transmission of health over time and how this process may differ by race/ethnicity.

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patient-care

The birth control pill: what’s fact and what’s fiction

There are plenty of rumors about birth control pills, more commonly known as “the pill”: The pill makes women gain weight. Antibiotics will make birth control less effective. You have to take the pill at the same time every day. But what’s actually true?

Health Talk sat down with Sarah Westberg, Pharm.D., associate professor in the College of Pharmacy, to find the answers.

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expert-perspectives

Mammograms: Cutting through the mixed messages

The American Cancer Society (ACS) announced this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association that it revised long-standing breast cancer screening guidelines. But other medical groups, including the American College of Radiology and the Society for Breast Imaging, are not adopting the new guidelines. So, who’s right?

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