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expert-perspectives

Death by caffeine? Dangers of caffeine dissected after teen’s death

Death by caffeine: an eye-catching headline when a coroner recently declared a South Carolina teen died from excessive caffeine consumption. In the span of two hours, according to reports, the 16 year-old drank a large Diet Mountain Dew, a cafe latte from McDonald’s and an energy drink, causing a “caffeine-induced cardiac event” leading to a probable arrhythmia.

The news surprised many experts in the medical community, including Joseph Garry, M.D., associate professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at the University of Minnesota Medical School.

“Deaths from caffeine ingestion are actually quite rare,” Garry explained. “However, this is entirely preventable and as such, any preventable death is tragic.”

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expert-perspectives

Rising trend among millennials: Botox

One could say, cosmetic surgery is seasonal. As summer starts to show its face, some plastic surgeons are seeing the faces of patients more and more.

Recently, many of the faces walking into those clinics belong to millennials. One of the biggest requests for this group: the drug botulinum toxin, commonly called Botox. According to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery Botox treatments for people 19 to 34 years old increased by 41 percent between 2011 and 2015.

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expert-perspectives

How food affects your mood

Chances are you’ve had a ‘bad hair day’ or two in your lifetime, or perhaps experienced the wrath of someone who’s woken up ‘on the wrong side of the bed.’ There are plenty of little things we attribute to our moods throughout the day- good or bad. As it turns out, the food we eat can play a large role in how we feel.

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expert-perspectives

Make refugee health care great [again], writes UMN assoc. professor

Many health care providers aren’t fully educated on the unique challenges and circumstances refugees may experience, which can negatively influence their care.

Philbrick recently published a commentary detailing these challenges in the May issue of the American Journal of Public Health. It is titled “Make Refugee Health Care Great [Again].”

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expert-perspectives

Shopping for sunscreen: what you need to know

Nearly 9,500 people in the United States are diagnosed with skin cancer every day. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. These numbers are only increasing; while most cancers are becoming less common, skin cancers are becoming more so.

Dermatologists at the University of Minnesota say there are ways to protect yourself from these statistics, and it starts by protecting yourself and your loved ones from the sun.

 

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expert-perspectives

The risks and benefits of new Netflix show “13 Reasons Why”

photo courtesy !ogan-paig3(: via flickr

People are buzzing about the new Netflix show “13 Reasons Why”, which chronicles a high school girl’s rationale for committing suicide. It’s entertainment factor is undeniable, but it also raises serious questions about the portrayal of mental health concerns, sexual assault and other issues facing youth today. Katharine J. Nelson, MD, of University of Minnesota Medical School’s Department of Psychiatry weighs-in on the risks and benefits of this show, and how parents can talk to their kids about key themes in the show.

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