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In the news: Frequent self-weighing among teens linked to negative health effects

Photo: Flickr user, Paola Kizette Cimenti, CC, https://flic.kr/p/9QWsLc

Stepping on a scale may seem like the most helpful way to measure weight loss progress, but a recent study from the University of Minnesota revealed that teens who often weigh themselves are more likely to have negative mental health effects.

Published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, the research found young women who frequently self-weigh may be at risk for depression and were more likely to have lower levels of self-esteem and body satisfaction.

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In the news: Study shows processed meats may increase cancer risk

Photo: flickr, CC, Didriks, https://flic.kr/p/a6YNau

It might be time to rethink the typical American backyard barbecue with hot dogs and bacon cheeseburgers. Recent research from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) found more evidence that red meats and processed meats should be eaten in moderation. The study revealed consumption of hot dogs, ham and other processed meats is linked to colorectal cancer. The University of Minnesota collaborated on the study.

The IARC classifies processed meat as a carcinogen and the associated risk of developing colorectal cancer is small, but increases with consumption. Experts determined 50 grams or 1.75 ounces of meat per day (about two strips of bacon or six thin slices of ham) can increase the risk of colorectal cancer by 18 percent.

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In the news: More than half of nursing mothers lack adequate workplace accommodations

Photo: flickr, Bridget Coila, https://flic.kr/p/ahjewq

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends nursing mothers breastfeed for six months, but a recent study from the School of Public Health revealed less than half of nursing mothers returning to work after giving birth have access to adequate accommodations to do so.

Published in Women’s Health Issues, the research analyzed data from 2,400 mothers who had given birth between 2011 and 2012, and showed 60 percent lacked the proper facilities and break times. The remaining 40 percent that did have access to accommodations were more than twice as likely to breastfeed for the entire six months.

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In the news: Newlyweds donate wedding gifts to UMN glioblastoma multiforme research

Photo credit: Deb Koepsell via KARE-TV

While most newlyweds expect a new dish set or place settings as wedding gifts, one couple skipped the registry altogether. Instead, they asked guests to donate towards a cause that hit close to home.

In 2007, Deb Koepsell learned her late husband, Tom Hastings, had developed glioblastoma multiforme, a cancerous brain tumor, when he lost vision in one eye. While seeking treatment at the University of Minnesota, the two met Stephen Haines, M.D., from the Department of Neurosurgery in the Medical School.

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Overweight girls with a positive body image gain less weight over time

Photo courtesy Flickr user Patrick Slaven

Body shaming has been a popular topic this year, sparking debates on whether it is detrimental or motivational. A new study from the University of Minnesota shows body shaming may be linked to weight gain in young girls.

The study, published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, shows overweight girls with a positive body image gain less weight later in life as compared to girls with negative self-images

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In the News: University of Minnesota Medical Center one of nine US hospitals prepared to treat Ebola

Photo Credit: Caroline Marin

After two nurses contracted Ebola when treating an infected patient, many nurses felt unprepared if a patient with the disease came through their hospital doors. One year later, the University of Minnesota Medical Center (UMMC) is prepared to face another outbreak since being named one of nine regional Ebola treatment centers in the U.S.

According to a recent Huffington Post article, not all U.S. hospitals can be ready to effectively and efficiently treat Ebola and other highly infectious diseases, so the U.S. appointed one hospital per region to specialize in treating highly infectious pathogens. They also designated other hospitals as assessment centers that could care for the patient until the disease is identified and then transport the patient to a regional center.

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