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research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: Some melanoma survivors still practice unhealthy sun behaviors

As spring and summer months approach, sun protection becomes more pertinent, especially for melanoma survivors. However, a recent study by Rachel Vogel, Ph.D, assistant professor in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health at the University of Minnesota Medical School found this segment of the population may not be taking necessary sun safety precautions.

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expert-perspectives

ACA repeal could greatly impact women’s health

Since President Donald Trump’s inauguration, there has been a steady drop in the probability that the Affordable Care Act will be repealed by the end of April. A recent Washington Post poll shows a 35 percent chance of that happening. However, this does not quell the fears raised by what a repeal could mean.

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expert-perspectives

Cervical cancer is killing more women than medical experts thought, study says

“In my opinion, the study’s most disturbing revelation was this: black women living in the United States die at the same rate from cervical cancer as women living in sub-Saharan Africa,” said Christopher Pennell, Ph.D., associate director for Community Engagement at the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, referring to a recent study about cervical cancer. “If this isn’t a wake-up call, I don’t know what is.”

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expert-perspectives

Expert Perspective: 1-in-4 U.S. men has HPV strains linked to cancer

Last week, a study published in JAMA Oncology revealed one in four men in the U.S. are infected with human papilloma virus (HPV). And, that’s just the people with the cancer-causing strains.

HPV is the leading cause of cervical cancer in women, and also a leading cause of anal and oropharyngeal cancers, especially in men.

Annie-Laurie McRee, Dr.P.H., assistant professor in the Medical School, weighs in on the data.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Tunneling Nanotubes: Cellular Highways for Cancer Drug Delivery, Study Suggests

The exceedingly narrow, long offshoots stemming from cancer cells called tunneling nanotubes exchange important cellular cargo vital to sustaining the cells. But new evidence published in Molecular Therapy – Oncolytics shows these tubes may be ideal for distributing cancer-killing viruses, offering a new avenue for cancer treatment.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Aspirin use shown to slightly lower risk of cancers

According to a study recently published in Cancer Causes & Controls, regular aspirin use may slightly reduce the risks of certain cancers.

The study, conducted by Kristin Anderson, Ph.D., M.P.H., and colleagues at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health suggests that aspirin use could have a small but protective effect in preventing breast, pancreatic, ovarian, and colon cancers in older adults. Other studies provide evidence of moderate benefits.

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