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expert-perspectives

Few teens receive medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction

Less than one percent of adolescents addicted to opiates receive medications to help them quit, new research shows.  The Journal of Adolescent Health says that’s compared to 12 percent of adults that receive medication.

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research-and-clinical-trials

What Can We Learn from the Patterns of Eating Disorders?

Eating disorders can take many forms. There is evidence to show that people with one form may transition to another over time. How and why this happens has not been closely examined, until now.

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expert-perspectives

Prepare to spring forward! Daylight saving begins Sunday March 12

Daylight saving time is fast approaching- a day many of us dread because it often means losing an hour of sleep.

“While it is only an hour shift, it means that suddenly our community is a little more sleep deprived then we already were,” said Michael Howell, M.D., Associate Professor in the Department of Neurology, Medical School.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Colon and colorectal cancers on the rise in U.S. millennials

Colon and colorectal cancers are among the most commonly diagnosed cancers in both men and women in the United States. A recent study released by the Journal of the National Cancer Institute shows these cancers are especially on the rise in millennials and GenX. The study showed the risk for these cancers increasing by around 3 percent each year.

The study also concluded that adults born in 1990 have a two-fold higher risk of being diagnosed with colon cancer compared to adults born around 1950. Furthermore, the risk of rectal cancer is four times higher in the younger generation.

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expert-perspectives

Rare Disease Day gives voice to serious illnesses

30 million Americans are affected by rare diseases – more than half are children.

 “We never know when a rare disease will affect us or someone we love.”

Jakub Tolar, M.D., Ph.D, Medical School, speaks from experience, treating children at the University of Minnesota with inherited diseases that are severe, many times, fatal. There are more than 7,000 rare diseases currently known to medical experts, and only 4% have an effective treatment.

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research-and-clinical-trials

Outcomes Improving for Pediatric Kidney Transplant Recipients

New research in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons shows pediatric kidney transplant recipients have significantly improved one-year survival rates, as well as improved organ function after 10 years. Study investigator Srinath Chinnakotla, MD, FACS, attribute the improvements to better surgical techniques, anti-rejection medication and living donor protocols.

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