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expert-perspectives

Research Snapshot: Genetic links to resilience in PTSD patients

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) affects roughly 20% of all veterans from the Afghanistan and Iraq wars. The disorder’s unfortunate prominence among those who’ve served prompted Lisa James, Ph.D., and Apostolos Georgopoulos, M.D., Ph.D., to investigate a genetic predisposition for PTSD.  James and Georgopoulos are researchers at the Brain Sciences Center, an interdisciplinary center between the University of Minnesota Medical School’s Department of Neuroscience and the Veterans Affairs Health Care System.

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expert-perspectives

Almost two decades later, doctor reflects on using embryo selection to save young girl’s life

Molly Nash was not expected to live to the age of 10. But her parents, and John Wagner, M.D., professor with the Department of Pediatrics in the Medical School, refused to let the genetics of her disease have the final word.

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research-and-clinical-trials

ICU Patients Can Safely Administer Their Own Sedatives, New Study Finds

Patients in intensive care units (ICUs) are often sedated to enhance their comfort with mechanical ventilator breaths and reduce anxiety. However, the prescribed sedatives are based on clinicians’ assessments of their patients’ discomfort or anxiety and may not meet their needs. Now, researchers at the University of Minnesota have found that patients can self-administer their own sedative in some cases, which could lead to a more tailored and possibly effective care experience.

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research-and-clinical-trials

New Study Determines What Makes ‘Successful’ Smile

New research shows that less is more when it comes to a successful smile, which could have implications for how surgeons and therapists work with patients who have facial paralysis. The University of Minnesota research may be critically important for helping stroke patients and other people with facial paralysis improve quality of life.

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expert-perspectives

Death by caffeine? Dangers of caffeine dissected after teen’s death

Death by caffeine: an eye-catching headline when a coroner recently declared a South Carolina teen died from excessive caffeine consumption. In the span of two hours, according to reports, the 16 year-old drank a large Diet Mountain Dew, a cafe latte from McDonald’s and an energy drink, causing a “caffeine-induced cardiac event” leading to a probable arrhythmia.

The news surprised many experts in the medical community, including Joseph Garry, M.D., associate professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at the University of Minnesota Medical School.

“Deaths from caffeine ingestion are actually quite rare,” Garry explained. “However, this is entirely preventable and as such, any preventable death is tragic.”

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expert-perspectives

Rising trend among millennials: Botox

One could say, cosmetic surgery is seasonal. As summer starts to show its face, some plastic surgeons are seeing the faces of patients more and more.

Recently, many of the faces walking into those clinics belong to millennials. One of the biggest requests for this group: the drug botulinum toxin, commonly called Botox. According to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery Botox treatments for people 19 to 34 years old increased by 41 percent between 2011 and 2015.

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