Academic Health Center
Stay Connected
research-and-clinical-trials

Research Snapshot: Complementary and Alternative Medicine use in Diabetic Adults

New research at the University of Minnesota shows increased use of complementary and alternative medicine in U.S. adults with diabetes.

Read more
expert-perspectives

Almost two decades later, doctor reflects on using embryo selection to save young girl’s life

Molly Nash was not expected to live to the age of 10. But her parents, and John Wagner, M.D., professor with the Department of Pediatrics in the Medical School, refused to let the genetics of her disease have the final word.

Read more
expert-perspectives

Man flu or myth? Why we study mice of different genders to understand illness

The term man flu is typically used in jest; perhaps in conversation between two women joking about how their husbands react to illness. For others, the phrase may be completely new. However, recently it has risen to the surface enough in mainstream media and water cooler discussions to draw interest from researchers.

Researchers at the University of Ottawa recently set out to essentially answer the question, do identical infections actually make males more miserable than females? The study involved injecting lab mice with molecules from bacteria. They found at the onset of infection the male mice’s body temperature fell more than females’ did. An article in Stat extrapolated this fit with the idea of the man flu.

Read more
expert-perspectives

Death by caffeine? Dangers of caffeine dissected after teen’s death

Death by caffeine: an eye-catching headline when a coroner recently declared a South Carolina teen died from excessive caffeine consumption. In the span of two hours, according to reports, the 16 year-old drank a large Diet Mountain Dew, a cafe latte from McDonald’s and an energy drink, causing a “caffeine-induced cardiac event” leading to a probable arrhythmia.

The news surprised many experts in the medical community, including Joseph Garry, M.D., associate professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at the University of Minnesota Medical School.

“Deaths from caffeine ingestion are actually quite rare,” Garry explained. “However, this is entirely preventable and as such, any preventable death is tragic.”

Read more
expert-perspectives

Rising trend among millennials: Botox

One could say, cosmetic surgery is seasonal. As summer starts to show its face, some plastic surgeons are seeing the faces of patients more and more.

Recently, many of the faces walking into those clinics belong to millennials. One of the biggest requests for this group: the drug botulinum toxin, commonly called Botox. According to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery Botox treatments for people 19 to 34 years old increased by 41 percent between 2011 and 2015.

Read more
expert-perspectives

Few teens receive medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction

Less than one percent of adolescents addicted to opiates receive medications to help them quit, new research shows.  The Journal of Adolescent Health says that’s compared to 12 percent of adults that receive medication.

Read more